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I don't see power and air designed in for your lift(s).
 

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Discussion Starter #602
I don't see power and air designed in for your lift(s).
I have electrical junction boxes on the ceiling for future lift installations. No air has been plumbed anywhere yet.
 

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I have electrical junction boxes on the ceiling for future lift installations. No air has been plumbed anywhere yet.
I tried to make mine "neat" by running the services through the slab. It worked for the one lift that I had planned for but since I changed my mind about the location of the second lift being in the new garage instead of the old garage I didn't do so well with that one. I grabbed power from a nearby outlet but the air became a problem. I still have not run a permanent air line to the second lift, it's just a piece of black poly tubing that is waving around in the breeze.
 

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Discussion Starter #604
I tried to make mine "neat" by running the services through the slab. It worked for the one lift that I had planned for but since I changed my mind about the location of the second lift being in the new garage instead of the old garage I didn't do so well with that one. I grabbed power from a nearby outlet but the air became a problem. I still have not run a permanent air line to the second lift, it's just a piece of black poly tubing that is waving around in the breeze.
My old lift didn’t need air to operate. I thought you just meant an air source for air tools/etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #605
If you look right next to the end of the garage door track, you’ll see the electrical box that was prewired for the lift. Just needs a lead down to the control box on the lift.
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RunOpel
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Well it will be worth the wait Bob, especially if we get to benefit from your experience and fabrication :)
 

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Discussion Starter #610
Bob, with the heat in the slab(s), were they thickened up to compensate for the added piping?
Mark, because of the size of the floor, the builder made them thicker than usual. There’s a vapor barrier over the compacted stone, then 2” foam board for insulation, then the piping was attached directly to the foam board. Rebar grid was then placed over the piping. Over that is roughly 6.5-7” of concrete. Kind of overkill.

In the bottom pic you can see the ‘step’ from the concrete floor level to the wooden deck above the basement area. They filled it with that much concrete!

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RunOpel
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Wow Bob that is impressive to say the least :) What was the total yards of concrete used on your project?
 

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Discussion Starter #612
Wow Bob that is impressive to say the least :) What was the total yards of concrete used on your project?
I really have no idea. But it took 6 concrete trucks just to pour the footings. I wasn’t there for the pouring of the floors.
 

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RunOpel
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That's a lot of concrete :) hope you never have any issues with your radiant floor heating. Would hate to jack hammer that out 😝
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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Tnx, Bob. Makes sense.... There are essentially 'grooves' in the bottom of the concrete where the piping is. So I'd expect some thickening with the weight that the floor will see. And I guess the foam will see the load spread out... never would have thought it would take the load. Is it a particular brand/model of foam board? Looks like some thought went into it.
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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Wow Bob that is impressive to say the least :) What was the total yards of concrete used on your project?
In our neck of the woods, a concrete truck would carry 8-9 yds per load. It'll get reduced for steep grades, as it will slosh out the back LOL. 6 loads is a LOT of concrete just for footings!
 

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Discussion Starter #616
Started putting up racks for metal tubing storage. No more storing crap on the floors!

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Mark, because of the size of the floor, the builder made them thicker than usual. There’s a vapor barrier over the compacted stone, then 2” foam board for insulation, then the piping was attached directly to the foam board. Rebar grid was then placed over the piping. Over that is roughly 6.5-7” of concrete. Kind of overkill.

In the bottom pic you can see the ‘step’ from the concrete floor level to the wooden deck above the basement area. They filled it with that much concrete!

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Over here the piping is always attached to the rebar net so the heat can radiate 360° in the concrete.
 

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Tnx, Bob. Makes sense.... There are essentially 'grooves' in the bottom of the concrete where the piping is. So I'd expect some thickening with the weight that the floor will see. And I guess the foam will see the load spread out... never would have thought it would take the load. Is it a particular brand/model of foam board? Looks like some thought went into it.
We use floor quality styro foam or polyurethane foam. It's the layers under the foam that bears the load. The surface under the foam must of course be flat.
 

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Tnx, Bob. Makes sense.... There are essentially 'grooves' in the bottom of the concrete where the piping is. So I'd expect some thickening with the weight that the floor will see. And I guess the foam will see the load spread out... never would have thought it would take the load. Is it a particular brand/model of foam board? Looks like some thought went into it.
Rigid foam board is available with high compressive strength for below slabs etc. . 100 psi is available. Look up "Foamular 1000"
 
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