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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I just bought a 71 GT and I'm already in love. I don't plan on doing too much to it besides new wheels and paint in a year or two, but as someone who loves my imports (300ZX TT and GTI 1.8T) I really like the tuner look and a part of that is ride height. I was wondering if there was anyway to lower the front suspension?

I've found lowering springs for the rear which drop it 40mm but I can't seem to find anything for the front. Is there anything available? I looked up some stuff in the forum and saw that some people sometimes cut the springs or use springs out of a different car, but being so new to the Opel I don't want to guess on it so any information you could lend me I would appreciate !

Thanks

(PS heres what it looks like)

 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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14,606 Posts
I was wondering if there was anyway to lower the front suspension?

Well, yeah, you could buy lowering springs, but, gee, that costs money. If you want to be a REAL Opeler, you gotta think CHEAP(as in "cheapskate"). With CHEAP in mind you could.....

1) Put cinder blocks under the rear wheels

2) Let some air out of the front tires

3) Remove the front tires

4) Drive the car into a ditch

5) Park on a hill

6) Fill the nose of the car with scrap metal

7) Remove the front spring and just ride on the shocks(Heavy Duty recommended)


:lmao:
 

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Befuddled
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227 Posts
Well, yeah, you could buy lowering springs, but, gee, that costs money. If you want to be a REAL Opeler, you gotta think CHEAP(as in "cheapskate"). With CHEAP in mind you could.....

1) Put cinder blocks under the rear wheels

2) Let some air out of the front tires

3) Remove the front tires

4) Drive the car into a ditch

5) Park on a hill

6) Fill the nose of the car with scrap metal

7) Remove the front spring and just ride on the shocks(Heavy Duty recommended)


:lmao:
#6 obviously requires your belly pan to be intact (not swiss cheese like so many out there), and able to support the weight of said scrap metal... :cool:
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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14,606 Posts
#6 obviously requires your belly pan to be intact (not swiss cheese like so many out there),
Ah, you're reefering:)veryhappy) to the ATS(Anti-Tailgating System) assembly. This is also part of the OPRS(Opel Parts Redistribution System). The belly pans serve no useful purpose other than to collect leaves, rust, dirt, and Opel parts that vibrate off the car during normal usage. This debris is held until the precise moment when you are being tail gated and have to slow down for a speed bump. The speed bump causes the battery to break loose, which then drops down and releases any remnants still remaining of your belly pan after 40 years of battery acid. These car parts, shrapnel, lead, and acid then assault the Honda with a hood scoop that is riding 3" off your bumper. As another plus, this redistribution of your car's parts can now be easily found by fellow Opelers who are hitchhiking on the side of the road after their weekly breakdown. In this fashion, the OPRS function enables the stranded Opeler to retrieve your rusted off master cylinder and return their car to service.

<<<"As we all know, warming up the female parts helps things go in and out." - The Scifi Guy>>>


Wah! Ha! Ha! Ha!


:lmao:
 

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Can Opeler
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3,360 Posts
Ah, you're reefering:)veryhappy) to the ATS(Anti-Tailgating System) assembly. This is also part of the OPRS(Opel Parts Redistribution System). The belly pans serve no useful purpose other than to collect leaves, rust, dirt, and Opel parts that vibrate off the car during normal usage. This debris is held until the precise moment when you are being tail gated and have to slow down for a speed bump. The speed bump cause the battery to break loose, which then drops down and releases any remnants still remaining of your belly pan after 40 years of battery acid. These car parts, shrapnel, lead, and acid then assault the Honda with a hood scoop that is riding 3" off your bumper. As another plus, this redistribution of your car's parts can now be easily found by fellow Opelers who are hitchhiking on the side of the road after their weekly breakdown. In this fashion, the OPRS function enables the stranded Opeler to retrieve your rusted off master cylinder and return their car to service.

<<<"As we all know, warming up the female parts helps things go in and out." - The Scifi Guy>>>


Wah! Ha! Ha! Ha!


:lmao:
I think you should award yourself the scifiguy seal of approval for this post! :lmao:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Lindsay - Thank you! Do you have any idea how much those front springs drop the car? I couldnt seem to find any information on that on their site. Mind you my computer was bugging out so maybe I just couldnt get to it.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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They have 1" and 2" lowering springs. I suggest 1".

Beware! GT's have a very long nose in front of the front wheels relative to their wheelbase. It's VERY easy to bottom out the belly pans and tear off airdams. The 1" spring lowers the car just right, doesn't have the preload of the oem spring and is stiffer. Most of us have found the 1" lowering spring to be the best choice for street driving.
 

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Befuddled
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227 Posts
Ah, you're reefering:)veryhappy) to the ATS(Anti-Tailgating System) assembly. This is also part of the OPRS(Opel Parts Redistribution System). The belly pans serve no useful purpose other than to collect leaves, rust, dirt, and Opel parts that vibrate off the car during normal usage. This debris is held until the precise moment when you are being tail gated and have to slow down for a speed bump. The speed bump cause the battery to break loose, which then drops down and releases any remnants still remaining of your belly pan after 40 years of battery acid. These car parts, shrapnel, lead, and acid then assault the Honda with a hood scoop that is riding 3" off your bumper. As another plus, this redistribution of your car's parts can now be easily found by fellow Opelers who are hitchhiking on the side of the road after their weekly breakdown. In this fashion, the OPRS function enables the stranded Opeler to retrieve your rusted off master cylinder and return their car to service.
Well, that makes perfect sense...
I hereby rescind my previous comment. :D
 
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Opeler
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3,031 Posts
Intermediate sport front spring - Tuning Front - Suspension - Opel GT - Store | Opel GT Source
Part:3062 $175.00
Lowers car 1". Improves overall appearance and handling of your GT or Kadett without sacrificing ride quality.
Perfect for hot street or autocross applications. Use with your stock unmodified rear springs.
Installation instructions included.

Link was on Post #2, but your computer bugged out.
As Gordo indicated, I would lower GT (1) inch and not (2) inches.
If you have any questions, contact OPGTS.
 

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Super Moderator
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8,172 Posts
Wouldn't that make it a little springy, like an old cadi going down the hwy that bounces several times when going over a bump ?? :ugh:
Shocks are supposed to prevent some of what you're talking about but not I don't like the idea of softening the spring rates either. Pre-internet, I had mine de-arced at a spring shop to achieve the ride height I wanted.

Harold
 

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Super Moderator
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13,616 Posts
I would wack off 4 inches from the ends of the top leaf only. That will lower you about 1 inch.
It shouldn't lower you that much.

I modified Gary Farias' GT front spring by removing 7" from the top leaf and 4" from the second leaf, then I added the Chrysler ball joints. Total drop was 1-3/8". However I know from experience the ball joints themselves lower the front end by 7/8".
 

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Opeler
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Brad, you will still have to remove the front spring as this block is inserted between the spring and front axle crossbar. It decreases the spring arch. Spring will get higher preload, so installation is PITA and you must use spring compressor. I don't like it.
Intermediate spring is the way to go.

I like when the GT is lowered 2", however 2" lowering spring is so hard on the road that I was seriously concerned that the frame rails might crack. I settled with 1" (intermediate) spring plus Chrysler ball joints, total 2" but the car is still reasonably comfortable on the road.
 

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Befuddled
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227 Posts
If you didn't want to disassemble the front end to change the spring, what about this option from Splendid in Germany.....When they get them back in stock :ugh:
Is that a Lowering Block for the leaf spring?
 

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Registered
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Is that a Lowering Block for the leaf spring?
Ya, far as I understand it, it ( lowering Block ) is installed in the middle of the spring, this causes the spring to bow in the middle, there for pulling up the 2 ends, 30 - 40 mm . BUT since installation requires the spring to be removed, or at least both ends disconnected, you might as well install the 1" or 2" lowering spring from OGTS
 

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Opeler
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Back in the Classicopel(dot)com (Yahoo Groups) days, welded spring shackles were used to lower the GT front.
Think that was before lowering spring were available.
 
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