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It's for Manta B, so the rack diameter is too large, and the rack itself is too long. They can be machined to fit but it's definitely not plug and play. Been there, done that.
 
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Sorry to resurrect this thread.
@RallyBob of all the quick rack conversions you’ve done, which was was the most agreeable when it comes to price/effort?

im interested in the various factors at play here. The quafie unit sounds nice, but is the machine work intense enough that a regular machine shop couldn’t handle it?

is there an easier solution you’ve arrived at and liked?
 

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Sorry to resurrect this thread.
@RallyBob of all the quick rack conversions you’ve done, which was was the most agreeable when it comes to price/effort?

im interested in the various factors at play here. The quafie unit sounds nice, but is the machine work intense enough that a regular machine shop couldn’t handle it?

is there an easier solution you’ve arrived at and liked?
I’ve done three variations, and all have their pluses and minuses.

ENEM (Swedish) fast rack. I’ve measured this to be 2.6 turns, lock-to-lock. Direct fit to the original Manta/Ascona A housing. No modifications needed. Steering effort is very good for the increase in quickness (due to helical-cut pinion gear). Requires deleting the factory rubber “rag joint” and replacing with a second universal joint and a section of 19 mm D-shaped steering column.

Quaife Manta B fast rack. I’ve measured this to be 2.4 turns lock-to-lock. Rack shaft needs to be shortened, flats machined for wrench, and drilled and tapped for inner tie rod. Original rack housing end bushings need to be machined oversized, as the rack shaft is 24 mm instead of 22 mm. The rack thrust bushing needs to be machined or honed to size to match the larger rack diameter too. Assembly is a bit different than OEM as the pinion diameter is too large to fit from the top of the rack, and must be inserted from the lower side of the rack housing. Not difficult...just different.
Pinion gear is straight cut, not helical cut, so steering effort is noticeably higher than with the ENEM rack and pinion. Requires second universal joint in steering column, rubber “rag joint” deleted, plus the aforementioned 19 mm D-shaped steering column extension.

In-line steering quickener. This requires more fabrication and arguably more cost up front, but there are a few advantages. All parts are US sourced. The ratio can be easily changed by changing quickeners. If a vehicle’s steering is damaged in racing, this is the easiest solution, since a damaged fast ratio rack means you need to stock a spare fast ratio rack to fix it (found that out the hard way!). With a quickener you just use stock racks, albeit with modified pinion. Requires a solid welded mount for the quickener, a quickener, input spline adapter, universal joint, and machining the stock pinion, plus adequate welding. Quickeners are available in 1.5:1 or 2:1, giving the option of 2.6 turns or 1.95 turns (stock is 3.9 turns).
 
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I’ve done three variations, and all have their pluses and minuses.

ENEM (Swedish) fast rack. I’ve measured this to be 2.6 turns, lock-to-lock. Direct fit to the original Manta/Ascona A housing. No modifications needed. Steering effort is very good for the increase in quickness (due to helical-cut pinion gear). Requires deleting the factory rubber “rag joint” and replacing with a second universal joint and a section of 19 mm D-shaped steering column.
Is this the one you're referring to? https://www.enem.se/produkter.asp
 
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