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Bikini Inspector
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Todays tidbit and deep thoughts...

What an eclectic and eccentric big group of knowitalls we are.... From every walk of life and corner of the globe... Its not hard to notice that this site is teaming with fellers who been through it all and think their way is best. Straight up 5 pages on best way to heat a bolt for george sake... Along with that comes great knowledge and tall tales.

Anywho, Opel GT owners seem to be quirky and all of us very intelligent in our own regards. Well maybe not all of us.

I pride myself on knowing a little bit about alot of stuff. Please share your useless fact, POP QUIZ, funny saying, fishing story, recipes and deep thoughts here. So go ahead and push out that remnant of High school algebra and make room for these factoids...

Wrench got it started yesterday with how horses cant puke.....

my turn.. and ill keep it equine related

The placement of a donkey's eyes in its' heads enables it to see all four feet at all times!
 

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Registered
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Well I guess that a slug has more time to see it's surroundings :haha:
Just playing around dude.
 

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Administrator
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10,080 Posts
The average cruising airspeed velocity of an unladen European Swallow is roughly 11 meters per second, or 24 miles an hour.
Link for those under age 50:
:haha:
 

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1000 Post Club
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4,110 Posts
Famous Horses

Since we started off with an equine theme, one of my favorite subjects, here are a few tidbits.

Mr Ed's real name was Bamboo Harvester.

Secretariat and I share the same birthday, March 30. He was born in 1970 so he is 7 yrs my Jr.
 

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Premium Member
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1,686 Posts
Bird Facts

I have studied birds for probably 22 years. I carve shorebirds, ducks and raptors. Here are some strange facts (useless of course) about several birds:

Kiwi birds are blind, so they hunt by smell.

A group of larks is called an exaltation, a group of chickens is called a peep, a group of geese is called a gaggle, a group of ravens is called a murder, and a group of owls is called a parliament.

Mockingbirds can imitate many sounds, from a squeaking door to a cat meowing.

The first bird domesticated by humans was the goose.

Owls turn their heads almost 360○ (a complete circle) but they cannot move their eyes.

A bird’s eye takes up about 50 percent of its head; our eyes take up about 5 percent of our head. To be comparable to a bird’s eyes, our eyes would have to be the size of baseballs.

The Albatross has a wing span of up to 14 feet and only needs to land once every couple of years to breed. They can travel hundreds of thousands of miles each flight.

A flamingo can eat only when its head is upside down.

A seagull can drink salt water because it has special glands that filter out the salt. Also they are called just "gulls", not seagulls.

A duck's quack doesn't echo anywhere, and no one knows why.

OK, that's enough nonsense for now.

Bob
 

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UngerDog
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1,290 Posts
I studied mocking bird calls in college. They can mimic just about anything...even the jingle of my car keys. But, I'll argue that a human should be the correct answer for the fastest animal on earth... one has achieved a free fall of 321 mph...without the aid of wings.

And, although a Jerusalem donkey must be some kind of strange creature, a Jerusalem cricket must be from some kind of strange planet...

 

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Über Genius
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9,084 Posts
Okay Ornithologists...

What is the fastest animal on earth and/or within earths atmosphere?
I thought it was the horse fly with the ability to travel at 90MPH under it's own power.
A diving falcon is cheating.


But, if you want to really wrap your head around something....

Are you all aware that NOTHING actually touches ANYTHING?
 

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Sick with Opelitus
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You can buy your kids books, but you can't make them read.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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14,606 Posts
Here's some factoids that I taped to my toolbox at work:


The average D-cup breast weighs 8lbs. EACH! :banana:


And this one about world population:

"Before the invention of agriculture, the hunter/gatherer world population was probably no more than 5-10 million. By 1 A.D. that had risen to 300 million based upon fragmentary censuses in Rome, China, and the Mediterranean. Applying a high birthrate, it is estimated that 106 billion humans have been born. World population in the year 1900 is estimated at 1.6 billion. The 6.1 billion people currently alive(My factoid is about 10 years old) therefore represent 5.7 percent of all the people who have ever lived."


I heard recently that world population will actually start to decrease in the coming decades. Also apparently, Baby Boomers and their distaste for having lots of kids is a global phenomenon, not just a U.S. one, and most other developed countries will all be seeing their populations drop.

Holy Cow! Imagine how many dirty adult diapers there will be? Who's going to change them all? Luckily, there's a few young Opelers, like Frozen Tootsies and Ineca, in the pipeline to take care of our incontinence needs!


:lmao:
 

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Patrick
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861 Posts
So.... Could someone explain why guys have nipples????
 

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Über Genius
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We all know what crystals are, right? Crystals are those shiny, transparent and often colored, faceted rocks we see in rock shops and nature stores. They are one of those rare treats nature serves up once in a while for our wonder an enjoyment. Such geometry, straight in line and flat of face, exceptions to the grit, grime, and rubble of everyday existence. No wonder people have long thought they were miraculous, even gifts from the gods that had the power to heal and reveal.

Well, sad news for new age woo-woos, but about 90% of all substances are crystalline. Yes, ordinary rock, the steel in your fork, the ceramic in your breakfast bowl. Crystalline. Science trumps magic and superstition again, and replaces it with something even more amazing.

Do this. Go out and find any rock and break it open and examine it. What do you see? Lots of broken bits that look like they might have been grains of sand or something similar. They might be quite small, or may be as course as the grains in granite. Those grains? You guessed it. Crystals. Small, irregular in their outward appearance, but nonetheless, crystals.

Now take that broken rock and grind the fractured face flat, then sand it smooth, then sand it smoother, then polish it to a mirror finish. Now what do you see? Still irregular grains, but with clear to milky interiors. Inside those grains, everything is "uniform".

Now take a hunk of steel and cut it open, grind it flat, sand it smooth, and smoother, and even smoother, then polish it to a mirror finish. What do you see? You're eyeball. So etch it with a mild acid, say, a touch of nitric acid in alcohol. Now what to you see? It has gone gray, but you can just barely make out little grains, just like in those rocks, but smaller. So get a magnifying glass, or a microscope, and now what do you see? Grains. Irregular in shape, but smooth, uniform in the interior, usually. Sometimes the interior is a mess of lines that looks a little vaguely like a fingerprint. But don't worry, that two is crystalline, just not the kind that form independent of the other.

The interior of those grains, in the rocks and that hunk of steel, that uniformity, that is our crystal. Crystals of quartz, feldspar, and iron, and yes, you'd see the same thing if you have examined a chunk of copper, titanium, even frozen argon.

Internally, these grains are extremely regular, and to get a picture of why this is so, why it is so cool yet so ordinary, try this. Grab a flat-bottomed pan and dump a hundred or so small ball bearings in it, enough to cover maybe half of the bottom of the pan in a single layer of balls. Now roll that pan around and watch the balls roll around. Think of that as a liquid and the balls as atoms that move about freely. Now steady the pan as you tilt it slightly towards you. The balls should settle down and the whole mess becomes more compact, the balls less mobile, and think of this as a solid.

Examine the arrangement of the balls. Do you see islands where they form regular patterns? Perhaps a 2x2 pattern that makes little squares, or little triangles that form a series of hexagons? This is the essence of crystals, atoms arranged in an orderly way simply (mostly) because they fit together that way.

Now tap the pan with your finger while still tipping it slightly. Some balls (atoms) will move but only a little, certainly no long distances. Notice those arrays of balls, your crystals. What has happened to them? Some balls have moved into previously open spaces, have fallen into one of the "regular" positions, and your crystals have "grown" larger. Tap it a little more and see what happens. A little more growth. At some point your tapping does very little to your little model so we can think of this as pretty stable, not most stable, not perfect, but without going to quite a bit of effort that is what you are going to end up with.

Now examine this. Regular arrays of balls (atoms), but the shapes of those arrays are irregular, like the grains in your rocks. Some edges of your models grains will be straight, many not, and those that are not will have a stair-step look to them. While examining the edges of your "crystals" not the sizes and shapes of the gaps in them. If you had some smaller ball bearings you could probably fit one or two in those gaps. Hmm, misfits, impurities, segregating at "grain boundaries". Yes, that does happen in real life, a lot.

Your crystal might also have some gaps inside of them, as if a ball had been plucked out. A "vacancy"! And of course you could slip an "impurity" in there if you wanted to.

Lastly, examine the top of your "crystalline solid". Do you see straight "surfaces", like those you'd expect to see in rock-shop crystals? At a free surface the balls (atoms) can easily roll around and settle into "regular" positions. So there you go, rock-shop facets.

Last experiment. Sprinkle a little table salt onto the table. Grab a magnifying glass. What do you see? Ordinary, salt ________! (fill in the blank)
 
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