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Opeler
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3,565 Posts
In order to prevent strain on the cable, you might consider cable pulley from Honda CB750. It is very similar to what you are already using on your FI, except it consists of two pieces with a strong spiral spring in between. When FI reaches full throttle but you still have stroke left on gas pedal, the spring will allow pulley to further rotate, minimizing strain on the cable. It might work for you, although it will require chroming.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #542
I visited the Lokar website today to look into getting some different cable options and I discovered......that I'm a dumbass. I didn't think that the Lokar cable was disassemblable, even though I saw a set screw that looked exactly like something that would clamp the cable on a disassemblable cable set up.

This changes everything. Now I have the option to alter the length of the cable and the housing instead of endless revisions to my cable housing stop brackets. Too much cable and not enough housing? No problem, just remove the removable end of the cable and slide an extra length of cable housing onto the cable. Now the amount of cable sticking out is shorter and the amount of cable housing is longer. Don't like the type of end the cable has? No problem, take apart the cable and put the end on that you desire.

I'm normally averse to the type of cable end clamp that rams a set screw into the side of the cable. This boogers the cable all up. But Lokar sells a bunch of these things, so I guess it works and stands the test of time. The great thing is that you can use bicycle cable and parts to repair broken cables. In my case, I needed a standard bicycle cable "barrel" end to actuate the throttle body. The Lokar cable didn't have that, so that began the first of my mods and involved taking apart, drilling, and reconfiguring the throttle body actuator wheel. But that meant that I had to use the end of the cable that would easily attach to the gas pedal on the throttle and the other cockamamie end on the pedal.

Blah, blah, it all means that I can attack the cable attachment with many more GOOD options, instead of the bad options I was doing. Stay tuned........ :)
 

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RunOpel
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831 Posts
Gordo that engine is a work of art :) Like Terry said, its hard not to keep looking at it. You certainly have a one of a kind and will be the talk of any car show you go to. I cant but wonder how much of a pain it will be if and when you have to repair or replace something on it. As beautiful as it is, the more I look at it, the more I'm happy to just have my simple 1.9 as it is very easy to work on :)

But I'am looking forward to you getting it running and driving it on the road :):):)
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #544
Yeah, I'm way past "easy". But, as I discovered last year while I was chasing what was causing my engine woes, the work I did was pretty rock solid. It was the work done by other people that spelled my engine's doom. This FI set up is taking a long time because it's new to me and most other Opeler's experience. There wasn't a well-trodden and documented path to bring it all together, so I went astray on a few things. But, this is entry level FI and I'm having fun, I'm learning, and I've got all sorts of new gizmos to jazz up with chrome. Yeah, I cuss and bitch, but that's how I work. With luck I'll never have to go hog wild on a GT engine compartment again, so I'm savoring the pleasure as well as the pain. :)
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #545
Stainless throttle bracket

I had been saving a sweet piece of 1/8" thick stainless steel scrap metal I found at work that was probably a heat shield for some sort of contraption. You don't find 1/8" thick stainless, that's already been bent at various right angles, very easily. It would be darn near impossible for me to bend 1/8" thick stainless at a nice sharp 90* angle at home. On top of that, it already had 2 holes that matched the spacing of the existing throttle bracket mounting bolt holes on my 2.2 manifold. Drilling stainless eats up drill bits. So, I'm finalizing the throttle cable set up on my car and it was time to replace my flimsy temporary mock-up bracket with a sturdy ass-kickin' one. Being stainless, it's a welcome addition to my chrome and stainless engine compartment.

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I just contacted Lokar to request the parts to make a custom throttle cable. 5 feet of housing, 7 feet of cable, 3 different styles of cable ends, and a couple of fittings. Ideally, I would like the cable to flow straight back to the firewall, behind the engine, down behind the starter, forward and up to the driver's side motor mount area where my cable stop bracket is just below the gas pedal. This should eliminate sharp bends, bending the cable down between the manifold runners, dodging the exhaust, rubbing against the passenger side motor mount, and hugging the oil pan. We'll see what sort of outrageous price they want.....
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #546
The Wonderful World of Throttle Cables

The last mechanical thing for me to do on my GT's Opel Motronic FI conversion was to finalize the hook up and adjustment of my throttle cable. I had bought Lokar's deluxe polished 36” universal cable. The longest they offered on their website. It took me 8+ freakin' hours of rig jobs, reconfiguring my throttle body, and making multiple cable stop brackets. I ended up with bends that were a little too sharp, the cable too close to the exhaust, the cable rubbing the motor mount, cable angle issues, and a throttle cable system that would be hard to repair on the side of the road if any part of it broke. In essence, it worked, but it sucked. I did too much nice work on my engine compartment to have such a critical component be such a cluster flock of poor function and rig jobs.

If only I could get more choices of cable ends and a much longer cable, I could do a much better job. I contacted Lokar to take advantage of their custom throttle cable service. I have a 3 day weekend and I wanted this job done NOW, so that I could move on to the wire harness modding and hook up and start the dang car.

The problem was that you can't buy all the different cable ends and a super long cable from Lokar. They're not individually listed on their website. The various cable ends are scattered amongst the various cables they offer for different kinds of engines and they really want you to buy their Lokar gas pedal kit, which they would all attach to easily. Opelers don't like to replace parts on their cars unless they absolutely have to. Not only didn't I want to replace the beloved gas pedal that I've been stepping on for the past 40 years, I also would have had a nightmare trying to get it out of the car due to my electric power steering unit. No way, I'm keeping my pedal.

Lokar did not get back to me promptly. Instead of just telling me how much it would cost for all the widgets I wanted, they kept asking me one question a day. Hey man, I'm in a hurry here, one email a day ain't getting' this car running! So, I went to the Summit site and found a Lokar throttle kit with a 6 foot cable. Why the flock isn't that cable listed on their website? WTF! I was out of time. I whipped out the plastic and bought 3 separate entire throttle cable kits that each contained one or more of the widgets I wanted and had it sent overnight so that I could install them this weekend and holiday. How much? Let's just say that I've spent well over $300 on 4 throttle cable sets. Let's also say that I've now got LOTS of spare cable throttle parts.

In a nut shell, there are 5 types of cable ends that Lokar offers to attach to various engine set ups. A U-shaped type that they seem to refer to as a clevis, another that looks like half of their clevis end, a heim joint style, a right angle swiveling bolt type, and a basic bolt-on barrel end similar to what's on a bicycle brake cable. I'm hoping to have the whole cable system hooked up and working great in less than 2 hours with no rig jobs and “issues”.

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RunOpel
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831 Posts
Very nice Gordo :) but if you keep spending 💲 your not going to be able to retire at the end of the year 😢
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #548
I'm on budget, this was a last minute thing to wrap up the project. :)

All done with the cable throttle mod! Gosh, it sure is nice when you have the right parts. It took me 2 hours to undo the mods I did to make the incorrect and too short cable work. Once everything was back to their pre-molestation state, it only took an hour to hook everything up and get it adjusted.

I used the barrel end and the swiveling right angle cable end. For smoothest flow of the cable it required 48" of cable housing and 60"-65" of cable. I have the cable going all the way back to the firewall, down and across the top of the bell housing of the transmission, well under the starter and forward to the front of the driver's side motor mount where the cable stop bracket is, and to the pedal.

I have an automatic, so the bracket and pedal are shared by the kick down cable(Yes, the cable is frayed in the pic. Those cables are pieces of schit.). For no other reason than that it looks cool, I've kept some of my chromed solid linkage and attached that to the pedal, also. I like a firm gas pedal, so as a last step I add a return spring hooked under the engine's motor mount "ear" and hooked onto the pedal.

It all works great!

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #550
Realistically, it should only take me about a day to identify and divide the wires in the wire harness that run the engine and power/ground the system from the wires that I don't need. I plan just doing that, hook up power and plug in the gizmos, then just lay the computer on the cowling and turn the key. If it starts and runs well......mission accomplished! Then I'll work out how I'll route the wires in the engine compartment, extend or shorten wires if needed, then drill a big 2" diameter hole near where the stock heater pipes enter the engine area. That's for the huge computer connector to pass through. I don't have the stock heater and the rectangular opening for it is presently blocked off with a piece of aluminum diamond plate. It's hidden by the dash. That plate would be the perfect place to mount the computer. Do all that, dress up my wiring, and she's ready to rock and roll.
 

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RunOpel
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831 Posts
I like the way you mounted and routed the cable throttle Gordo :) If you can, video the start up so we can hear the engine run :):)
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #552
Yeah, I'll make a video when the day comes.

Holy Cow, no wonder I couldn't make sense of the wiring diagram. WAY too much use of the letter B and the color changes if it is followed by a big R or a small r and it changes if B is in the first or second position. Look at this color code chart and then compare them to what you see in the diagram. Just about every color has a B in it.:
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Okay, so for you guys who aren't used to looking at this stuff, the rectangular box running across the center is the big plug for the computer. The numbers in the box stand for the individual terminals. In the diagram, the numbers are not written numerically as they appear on the plug. On the plug they go 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.. So, say you want to see what terminals the Cooling Temperature Sensor in the lower left are attached to. You follow the 2 wires, BrL and BrG, back to the center box and they connect to pins 45+26. The above diagram is for a 4 cylinder 2.4 and it has been simplified to mainly show the stuff that runs the engine and powers/grounds the FI stuff. Now look at the diagram for the 6 cylinder version:

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It's basically the same diagram with a whole bunch of stuff that runs the auto tranny and a few other things. Notice that the colors are fully worded out in english. Now pick a device, like the temperature sensor(Coolant Temp. in the upper right), and follow the wires back to the big center box. They go to pins 26+45, the same as on the 4 cyl diagram.

This is the way that modern electronics in machines is set up. I have the same style of wiring diagrams at work. My machine at work basically has dozens of controllers(small purpose built local computers, like the FI computer, that run a specific group of devices) that are wired up like the above. A modern car has about 50 of these "local computers" or controllers.

Because I can't be 100% sure that the devices plugged into specific pins don't change between the 4 and 6 cylinder diagrams, I have to trace each wire from each device back to the computer plug to verify. It's fairly easy to pull the cover off of the computer plug to see which wires are going to which terminal in the plug. It ain't rocket science, it's just tedious. Because so many wires have the same or similar color codes, I can't just look at the plug for, say, the temp sensor, and compare it's colors to the diagram to verify that it is in fact for the temp sensor. There are other plugs that have the same colored wires going to them. The only way to know for sure is to trace each wire from the computer plug all the way out to the device plug and label it. There's only about 9 device plugs(Injectors and sensors) and about 7 power and ground related individual wires to trace. Identify and plug in or wire up those 16-20 wires and you're ready to turn the key. The computer plug has 55 terminals though. 15 are not used. 15+20 = 35. That leaves 20 additional wires that are used to run the auto tranny and a few other things.

So, that's what I'm going to do today. Identify and label the 16-20 wires needed to run the engine. All the other remaining 20 wires can be segregated and bundled up or cut off because I have no need for them and the computer just ignores them if they're not connected to anything.

Since I need to start at the computer plug, which has the wire terminals in numerical order, it would help the process if I had all the terminals and their wires listed in numerical order so that I could go down the line checking each one. So I compiled a list. The ones marked with an asterix are the ones needed to run the engine that I need to trace from the computer plug out to the device plug or loose wire.:

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Once I am done, I will then cross-reference the colors I see at the 16-20 asterixed wires and plugs with the 2 wiring diagrams to make sure that they agree with each other. I will then enter the color codes for each on my notebook chart and type it all up. When I'm done, anyone can then identify the wires and plugs and what they go to. The final step will be to figure out how to wire up the power, ground, and relay and draw up a simple diagram for that.
 

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RunOpel
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831 Posts
Seems so complicated Gordo, but you appear to have the skill set to perfect it :) Nice work :)
I hate to wonder how much time you have invested not to mention money.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #554
A year or more ago I had already paid Charlie $3500 for a 2.2 or 2.4 rebuilt engine and the fuel injection system and parts to make it all run in the Wagon I had bought. My wrist went kablooie and that ended my car restoration days and then the engine in the GTX revealed that it wasn't ready for prime time, so I decided to put the Wagon engine in the GT. I blew an additional $1000-$1500 on chroming, a new factory wiring harness, and assorted goodies. I'll get all or most of that last bit of expenditure back when the previous engine is rectified and sold. As said before, if the engine and parts were already in my hands all at the same time, and I hadn't done any bling stuff, I could have installed the engine, attached all the FI stuff, and wired it up, in about a month. Instead, it has taken 6 months due to waiting for parts, engine, bling, etc. I'm fortunate that we're having a mild no snow Winter so far.

Wire harness work begun:
I cut and stripped off the large wrapping, shrink tubing, and electrical tape that enclosed most of the length of the wire bundle. That took an hour. Then the bundle of wiring that you see draped over the belt sander needed to be isolated and bundled off to the side:

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In order to do that, those wires needed to get freed up from the Bundle of Goo. This was a 6" long area within the bundle that had been slathered with some sort of sticky, gooey, nothing dissolves it, funk that is almost exactly like hot bubble gum on a side walk:

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It was unbelievably tenacious. It stuck to everything it touched. WD40, various kinds of oil, carb cleaner, acid, nothing would break the stuff down. Each wire needed to be individually separated and thoroughly wiped clean. That took another hour and about 5 old T-shirts. All done! I'm taking a break right now, then I'll start the wire identification. :)

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RunOpel
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831 Posts
Wow what a mess. That does look like dried gum. What type of cleaner did you use to clean individual wires? I wonder if Goof Off would have worked?
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #556
I have to work with some extremely gooey, tacky, adhesives for labeling here at the Post Office and the glue builds up on the label cutters and applicators. Nothing dissolves that stuff either. So I've learned that if you have some built up gummy stuff that solvents won't dissolve, then just spray oil on it and surrounding surfaces, then try to sort of push the stuff around to those oiled areas. The gummy stuff won't stick to an oily spot. Then rags to grab and pull the gummy stuff off the area. It didn't take all that long to get the goo off the wires by pushing it back and forth along the oily wires and then pulling the globs off.

I basically finished the wiring seek and destroy mission yesterday. I just have to tape or seal off about 20 wires and it's ready to get installed in the car.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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13,821 Posts
Discussion Starter #558
Ha! Funny thing: I don't think I have relegated any of my Opel T-shirts to rag duty. I probably have 30 of them. But I also have about 50 from car shows. I had to stop buying shirts at shows, I go to too many shows. I've got so dang many T-shirts from shows that I take perfectly good ones, even brand new, and use them for rags. I've got some pretty threadbare Opel ones, army green ones are my favorite to wear when doing car work, but I won't insult them with rag duty. They're Holy Opel T-shirts. I never read that big book, but I'm pretty sure it's one of those 10 Commandos: Thou Shalt Never Discard an Opel Shirt.
 
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