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Discussion Starter · #341 ·
I tinkered with one of the new pistons yesterday. Notched it for the big-valve head, and deburred the edges.

Today I got my KLR650 ready for the riding season, so I didn’t play with Opel stuff much. The exception to this was cleaning up the crankshaft from the 1.9E engine. No rust on it, but it had a bit of patina from oil. A quick wire wheel shined it up nicely.

I’m my own worst enemy here. I could have left stock valves in the head which would have allowed me to use stock unmodified pistons. I could’ve used stock cast rods, or I could’ve used unmodified forged rods. I certainly could use a stock crank. But, the squirrel in the cage in my head wouldn’t let me.

So I think I will at least grind down the forging marks and sand things smooth. And maybe trim the counterweights. And maybe airfoil -shape the counterweight profiles. Which necessitates re-balancing of course…

I will also most likely add a couple of dowels between the flywheel/crank flange junction.
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Discussion Starter · #342 ·
Crank drilled for flywheel dowels.

I also took measurements showing the alignment bolt hole (which uses the full-shank flywheel bolt) compared to the rest.
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Discussion Starter · #343 ·
Knocked out the pilot bearing.

Usually I use a special puller but I couldn’t find it in the shop today. So instead I did the ‘hydraulic pressure’ routine and it worked great.

Filled the void with grease, and hammered in an old 4-speed input shaft with a dead-blow hammer. It came right out. No scratches.
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I also dug out some hardened steel dowel pins for my crank flange-to-flywheel pinning.
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Discussion Starter · #344 ·
I am sure my body will hate me for this, but it has begun.
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Bob
This may be a dumb question but, cleaning up the flash and casting stuff means the crank will have to be re- balanced?
 

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Discussion Starter · #346 ·
Bob
This may be a dumb question but, cleaning up the flash and casting stuff means the crank will have to be re- balanced?

Like I said…

So I think I will at least grind down the forging marks and sand things smooth. And maybe trim the counterweights. And maybe airfoil -shape the counterweight profiles. Which necessitates re-balancing of course…
 

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Discussion Starter · #347 ·
Trimming the counterweights has started. I made a template so they will all be relatively even.

Still tons to do, the radiused nose on the counterweight is comparatively easy, the tapered trailing edge is a PITA.
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Discussion Starter · #348 ·
I grabbed the old engine bearings and soaked them in solvent overnight. I will be taping them to the crank journals for protection during the grinding/lightening process.

The rear main thrust bearings showed typical wear from a frequent ‘clutch rider’. When you pull up to a stoplight, it’s better to put the car in neutral rather than keep it in gear and press the clutch pedal to disengage 1st gear. The reason is twofold…not only does the main thrust bearing wear out quicker, but so do the clutch release bearings.

Forward thrust face (not usually under any load).

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Rear thrust face, which is under load when the clutch pedal is depressed.
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Discussion Starter · #350 ·
A little more crankshaft work today. Filthy, filthy work. Metal dust everywhere. Ugh.

Getting closer though.
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Discussion Starter · #352 ·
No updates.

Taking some time off from this project for a bit to heal up. My hands aren’t doing well lately.
 
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Discussion Starter · #355 ·
I did a tiny bit of work in my shop today.

Basically I did a little deburring to the 1975 block, chased all the threaded holes, and blueprinted the oil passages where they meet the timing cover.

Lastly I enlarged the forward (unused) dipstick hole in the block to 9/16”, and then ran a 3/8” pipe tap into it for a barbed oil return fitting.

Not much, but it cured my boredom for the time being.

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Discussion Starter · #356 ·
My follow up to yesterday was just as lackluster.

I removed all the factory oil passage freeze plugs in the timing cover, and tapped them for thread-in pipe plugs.

I also gave the timing cover a rudimentary cleaning by soaking it in a shallow pail of lacquer thinner (each end for about an hour). Further scraping of the gasket surfaces was done to remove the old gaskets.

I will likely bead-blast this cover now that I’ve opened up all the oil passages for cleaning access. I’ll have the machine shop jet-wash the cover and block after they are decked (together), and then a final wash with hot soapy water and rifle brushes once I get it home.
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And for those that don’t know, a couple of variations on the 1975 timing covers are shown.

First of all, no mechanical fuel pump hole, since of course the EFI cars have a high pressure electric pump near the fuel tank.

And secondly the crank pulley has a timing mark, with a steel pointer on the timing cover to indicate the correct 5° BTDC ignition timing at idle for the EFI cars. All the carbureted 1.9’s in the US utilize the block pointer and flywheel mark to show 0° (TDC) for the ignition timing at idle.
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Discussion Starter · #358 ·
Very thorough! Are those taps NPT threads? Tapered?
Like I said, pipe plugs. So yes, they are tapered thread.

The threads on the top of the timing cover are 1/4” NPT, the others are all 3/8” NPT.
 
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