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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In general, what are the steps required to remove and re-install an oil pan on a 72 GT?
I see that for other 1900 models that the engine had to be hoisted up and the front suspension actually had to be removed to get to the oil pan.

My 73 Opel maintenance manual simply says: Install a "tool" that supports the engine, drain oil and remove the oil pan. I'm pretty sure these "tools" no longer exist. It also lists "remove oil pan bolts" before "drain oil". One way or another, I guess it'd get drained.

Based on other things I've found about this manual, I suspect that there may be more to it. Does the timing cover have to be removed to get to the oil pan and/or replace the oil pan gasket?

The manual says install the tool to support the engine but says nothing about removing any engine supports or brackets to get to the oil pan.

Instead of using this custom tool, can I just block up the engine and transmission somehow...or should it be suported from above on a wooden cross beam, etc.
 

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On the GT, the engine crossmember or subframe is below the oil pan. So to remove the oil pan the engine has to be supported from above and the subframe removed to drop the pan. Also if I remember correctly the clutch cable also goes through the subframe, so it may have to be removed too. HTH.
 

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Opeler
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On my 73' The Cable does not need to be completely removed, nor the crossmember completely removed, if memory serves me. Although I did it at the schools shop so it was on an Asymetrical Arm, Two post Lift 7 feet in the air. I believe I just popped the end of the Clutch Cable off the arm it attaches to, for some slack, Bungie'd up the crossmember, threw some old wood chunks on stand, and stuck it under the part of the block where block meets the oil pump. I then un bolted the crossmember,Two bolts on top through the engine bay, and about four to eight bolts on the underside of car (sorry, memory escapes me as I was heavily doused in gasoline that day I don't recall much other than how nice I smelled) Drained the Oil, removed Oil pan screws, dropped pan, cleaned up a bit with a cheapo gasket scraper, btw the cork side gaskets are easy to get off, the rubber/rtv Round end seals are a real PITA to get completely out (mine were rock solid and came off in 3mm chunks) replaced em with a oil pan gasket kit from napa, replaced oil pan, Reversed removal steps.

Sorry for the long winded post, another day of Gasoline Bliss left me a little loopy. So to answer your question.....didn't have to remove suspension or timing cover, just need to rasie your car enough to clear you and the crossmember and the pan, Roughly 2 feet(Jackpoints two feet off ground, not bottom of wheels) would most likely be enough clearance. You also need another Jack or Jackstand to hold up the engine, I seem to recall it slipping from the cheap screw type jack I was using and supporting the motor with one arm whilst I readjusted the jack with my other, but I may have been daydreaming this. Safety First though! or nobody will share a few stories that make you never want to get under anything heavier than you can benchpress.
 

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I did this 2 winters ago on my '72 GT. Securly Support the engine from above. I lifted the engine approx 1/4" to take the weight off of the motor mounts. Disconnect the motor mount via the top bolts(one on each side). Disconnect the Clutch Cable. Unbolt Crossmember from frame/body. You now have free access to the oil pan.

Make sure the engine is securly supported if you are going under the car. Don't just use an engine lifter to hold the engine, these can fail and you don't want an engine/trans combo landing on you. Use something secure like a heavy duty chain.

HTH

Jeff
 

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Opeler
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Here is what I've done. The manual I have showed a picture of a Manta with the engine supported by a big wooden frame. I figured that'd work on a GT too. I bought a long 4x4 piece of wood, like what you'd use as a deck support. I cut it in half and stacked the two pieces on top of each other. This gives you a 4x8 beam. I drilled two holes in each end and bolted a big "J" bolt in each. I nailed two small blocks of 2x4 to each end. The 2x4 pieces need to be positioned so they will rest on the sides of the engine openning (the big seam down each side). I then hung a chain from each "J" bolt and bolted the other end of the chain to the bottom bolt of the alternator (where it bolts to the block) and on the passenger side there is actually a handy threaded hole just sitting there on the side of the block toward the front. Then I just tighten the nuts on the J bolts to raise the engine a bit. This takes the tension off the motor mounts so you can unbolt them without the engine sagging. You can then remove the engine support bracket, drop the pan, and do what ever else you need. I had to replace the engine mounts since they were busted. The engine isn't real heavy and you still have it bolted to the clutch, so there is no danger of doing any damage to the body. Just be sure to align the wood frame in the right spot before you nail the 2x4 pieces on. The hood openning is angled so the 2x4s need to be angled. I can update with a picture if you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It would be important for the wood cross beam to bear onto the flat ledge that the hood sits on when closed (I assume that this is what you mean) because the fender can't take any load, of course. That actually bends in when you lean on it at the wrong place.

It would be best to distribute the load along the ledge (seam) for a few inches on each side to reduce the bearing pressure. I would also screw in the 2x4's or whatever are used so that it is secure. The beam might tend to "want" to tip over and pry that joint loose. Don't want any chance of that when you're under the engine and car.
 

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#10 eye screws run into the overhead of my shop (lots of them) to attach heavy duty bungee cords (maybe more correctly called "tarp straps") into will hold up my dirt bike, or my snowmobile, the GT engine, heck, wanna see a picture of my entire race car suspended from the ceiling by bungee cords? The load spreads out very nicely, there is strength in numbers. You don't have to lift or jack anything up, just keep adding bungees until the load lifts. Incredibly simple...
 

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Opeler
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Here are two pictures. One shows the whole contraption and the other is a closer look at just one end.

The 2x4s do sit on the lip that the hood closes on. I agree the fender would never handle the weight. I also made them a little wider than the 4x4s so they spread the weight a little. You will notice that the holes for the two bolts are offset. You need to offset them because the engine isn't centered in the openning. So put the wood in place and then mark where the holes go. Also, note that the 4x4s are cut to the approximate size of the hood openning. You don't want them hanging over the fenders endangering the pain. I attach the chains to the block with two big bolts with big washers on them. You don't want the bolt slipping through the chain. The passenger side bolts into a hole on the side of the block toward the front of the engine. The driver side, pull the bolt that holds the alternator bracket to the block and bolt the chain on there. I used 17mm coarse threaded bolts 2" long and they go right in smoothly.

I can't show you a picture in the car right now because the car is off getting its clutch replaced. I didn't want to mess with it.

It may not look like much, but the setup is easy to make and easy to use.
 

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Here is the engine lift in the FSM (Ascona shown, Manta similar). It says to use Tool # J-23375 for the GT, but doesn't show an illustration. Anyone know what that looks like? In any event, I am sure that this support would be fine in a GT. HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
That is the correct tool # for the GT from the '73 catalogue. It shows a picture of it in place. It goes over the motor mount. It is a bent piece of steel that supports the engine on the sides of the engine bay, just over the motor mounts while the cross member is being removed. It has several angled bends in it and is difficult to describe.

The cross brace method, which is used in the manual for other 1900 cars is the way to go. You know it will support the engine and it's attached to the engine (as described here) at the two attach points they describe in the manual. If the loads are well distributed, it shouldn't bend the ledge of the engine compartment that it bears on. You wouldn't want that to happen, could put a wave in the quarter panel. That ledge is probably supported by the sheet metal that forms the unibody sides of the engine bay.

The support tool would have to be properly formed to fit and do the job and it would have to be made strong enough to support the load. It would be the easier route if they were still available though.
 

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Opeler
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I couldn't figure out how the official tool would work. The book says you hook it on the engine bracket, so by the description given by BDD, does it hook onto the engine supports that are bolted to the block? How would it stay on? That is what confused me. It seemed like it would be prone to slipping off. It would make sense if you bolted it to the same hole the motor mount bolts in, but how'd you ever get that to happen? I never found a picture. That is why I made one out of wood that worked like the Manta one in the picture. It works just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Page 6A-11 of the '73 Opel Service Manual says: Install tool by removing upper engine mount nut and installing fixture. Replace nut and tighten, The engine will now be supported by the tool, between the frame rails. Front suspension need not be removed from the GT.

Apparently, the tool bolts onto the top of the motor mount (?) and the bottom can be removed. The tool supports the engine by being wedged (must be an accurate fit which makes me wonder why Snap On would have anything that would exactly fit an Opel GT which nobody remembers anyway....except for the one their friend (actually a mere aquaintance) had in High School) between the frame rails. The "frame rails" are what the motor mount attaches to at the sides of the unibody enclosure if the engine bay.
 

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I have the tool ( was going to be trashed from the dealer that was being sold ) so I saved all opel tool I could find :eek: The tool bolts to top eng.
mount nut, then the base sets on body frame rail .You then remove the bolt
from bottom of eng. mount & can remove brace & oil pan . HTH also I hope to have photos posted soon :) Guyopel
 

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oldopelguy said:
Here is the factory GT fixture installed: Yet another reason to have more than one FSM, in particular the 1970 one may just be the best one to have.
I saw that as well Stephen, but the FSM refers to that diagram as an "Opel" (Meaning "Kadett"), and gives a different tool number for the GT. Maybe they are similar?
 
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