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Opel Rallier since 1977
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
I've not been following this, but I do have a suggestion:

Place a super thin skim coat of Anti-Seize inside the AL pulley and on the steel crankshaft shaft. Once installed and if exposed to any moisture, then the AL will tend to corrode to the steel shaft. Sometimes these crank pulleys and be really stubbonr once in place for a long time... as I am sure most everyone knows by now!.



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Über Genius
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I use Hylamar on most any pulleys since they tend to seep oil between this spot
Most every Opeler I've talked to about this oil seepage issue isn't aware the there's supposed to be a gasket between the distributor drive gear and the crankshaft pulley.

There should also be a gasket between the distributor drive gear and the crankshaft but I've never been a fan of removing the distributor drive gear. They're usually stuck on good.
 

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Most every Opeler I've talked to about this oil seepage issue isn't aware the there's supposed to be a gasket between the distributor drive gear and the crankshaft pulley.

There should also be a gasket between the distributor drive gear and the crankshaft but I've never been a fan of removing the distributor drive gear. They're usually stuck on good.
Huh... I must have missed that memo. I can't find a reference to a crankshaft gasket in any of the Factory Service Manuals. What do these gaskets look like, and where exactly do they go? I have wondered what prevents a tiny bit of oil from seeping out the minuscule space between the crankshaft and the pulley, but I just assumed that it was too tight to worry about.

It wouldn't be difficult to pull the front pulley and apply a bit of sealer to the outside of the crankshaft. I just had never worried about it. Until now.
 

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Huh... I must have missed that memo. I can't find a reference to a crankshaft gasket in any of the Factory Service Manuals. What do these gaskets look like, and where exactly do they go? I have wondered what prevents a tiny bit of oil from seeping out the minuscule space between the crankshaft and the pulley, but I just assumed that it was too tight to worry about.

It wouldn't be difficult to pull the front pulley and apply a bit of sealer to the outside of the crankshaft. I just had never worried about it. Until now.
I tore down my bone stock, 1973, low mileage, un-molested 1.9. I never found any evidence of gasket material behind the pulley or the gear. If they are supposed to be there, I'm wondering just how thick they may be because my pulleys are mis-aligned by .075". I am going to attribute this to late model, after market water pump casting and shaft. Not unusual to have to shim here or there. Unfortunately, I will need to turn the excess material off the inner face of the water pump pulley. It will work, just requires a little bit of extra effort - spelled OPEL.
 

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RunOpel
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I have to agree with Gary, I'm rebuilding a stock 1.9 engine from a 1970 Opel GT and there was no gaskets :no: Has anyone else run across this issue?
 

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Über Genius
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I have to agree with Gary, I'm rebuilding a stock 1.9 engine from a 1970 Opel GT and there was no gaskets :no: Has anyone else run across this issue?
The manuals will never mention the gasket. I don't know why.
I found out in the 80s when 8 asked what the extra gaske was for in a full gasket set. That's also when I found out about the distri utor gasket.
 

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Opel Key Master
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The manuals will never mention the gasket. I don't know why.
I found out in the 80s when 8 asked what the extra gaske was for in a full gasket set. That's also when I found out about the distri utor gasket.
I'm sorry but this is fake news. There is not a crank shaft gasket, if there was it would have a keyway cut into it. I do not see any reference to a part number in the parts book either. It was supposed to be just a tight fit tolerance and the crank pushes against the bronze distributor gear. But again...no gasket here.
 

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MODERATOR's NOTE: Posts copied/split off to separate thread to discuss this issue further
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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Discussion Starter #11
Interesting.... I can't say I ever found this behind-the-pulley gasket in an engine... But I never looked for one. And never recall having any such leakage. I'll keep my eyes open now.
 

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I tore down my bone stock, 1973, low mileage, un-molested 1.9. I never found any evidence of gasket material behind the pulley or the gear. If they are supposed to be there, I'm wondering just how thick they may be because my pulleys are mis-aligned by .075". I am going to attribute this to late model, after market water pump casting and shaft. Not unusual to have to shim here or there. Unfortunately, I will need to turn the excess material off the inner face of the water pump pulley. It will work, just requires a little bit of extra effort - spelled OPEL.
Thank you that explains the difference I noticed when I put my new water pump on
 

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I'm sorry but this is fake news. There is not a crank shaft gasket, if there was it would have a keyway cut into it. I do not see any reference to a part number in the parts book either. It was supposed to be just a tight fit tolerance and the crank pushes against the bronze distributor gear. But again...no gasket here.
My bad, the gasket was said to go between the timing gear and the distributor drive gear. There's no woodruff key there.
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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Discussion Starter #15
OK. I gotta wonder what the purpose was... it won't stop leaks through the pulley bore back there.
 

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Opeler
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There are two keys at the front of crankshaft. One is holding timing gear and distributor gear, another one is holding the pulley. So, if there was a gasket there it should have a keyway slot.
 

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Über Genius
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OK. I gotta wonder what the purpose was... it won't stop leaks through the pulley bore back there.
Here's what I was told in the 80's. Remember I was just out of high school and rebuilding the engine for the first time after spinning a bearing. The guy that told me this was the one that physically ground my crankshaft.

The extra gasket, that was in the set, only fit ONE place in the engine. It went over the crankshaft perfectly. He said the timing chain was well lubed and splattered oil everywhere. This is something we all know is true.
The angle of the gear, that spins the distributor, would "send" oil to the spot where the gasket should go. He said that the gasket would reduce the amount of oil that would escape.

It's not a big deal to add a gasket there and, in reality, there should be oil preventive measures taken in that area.
 

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Opel Addicts
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You may be right...

But it reminds me of a time when an Opel Friend (Don Jenkins, RIP) asked me if I could bring him a 1.9 Head. He was having his engine rebuilt in his restored GT by a local mechanic who told Don that he was very familiar with the Opel engines. Since it was the day before we were leaving for Carlisle, Steve Daniels was with me. We drove out to this shop and found Don's familiar Yellow GT with the valve cover off. We looked at the cam sprocket and there was no plastic button. We tracked down the mechanic and informed him that there was supposed to be a plastic button on the front of the camshaft to keep it in place when the engine was running. As serious as he could be, this "mechanic" told Steve and me " this is a special camshaft and it doesn't require a button". We tried to explain why this could not be true, but the mechanic insisted he was the authority on this subject.

Well... we all know how the story ends. Don drove the car the two miles to his house and all was fine. However, the next time he went to drive it on a trip of 100 miles, the engine only lasted a few more miles before his freshly "rebuilt" engine destroyed the valve train, because the camshaft walked without the button to keep it in place.

I know we all want to be smarter than anyone else, but I've learned to listen to guys that specialize in our beautiful little cars, because there are some things that are different about them, besides the idiosyncrasies of their owners!

Allen Gage :cool:
 

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Opeler
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Hey Allen, remember that "specialist" that assembled the engine without head gasket? The engine even fired up.
 

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Opeler
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The extra gasket, that was in the set, only fit ONE place in the engine. It went over the crankshaft perfectly. He said the timing chain was well lubed and splattered oil everywhere. This is something we all know is true. It's not a big deal to add a gasket there and, in reality, there should be oil preventive measures taken in that area.
There is a gasket (OGTS PN 6075) that comes with the complete gasket set, however it actually goes between the distributor housing and timing cover. The ID would also fit the crank in the area you refer to, but it doesn't belong there.
 

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