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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
I am using the Redline 99009.131 fuel pump that puts out 8 PSI. This regulator (Redline 31800.050) is needed to reduce the pressure down to 2.5 PSI for the side drafts. Otherwise the pressure will overwhelm the float valve.

I want to move to a throttle cable at some point but I just haven't had the time to figure out the best way to accomplish this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Great color!! and nice rims!
Thanks.
The rims came from OGTS. Team Dynamics 15 X 8 with the correct offset.
Tires are Nitto NT Neo Gen 205 50 15.

Paint is 2004 Ferrari Giallo Modena Yellow 4305
Exterior - DuPont Waterbone Base coat M6083
Engine compartment - PPG Urethane 84028

It's weird how different the car color photographs in different light. It actually looks different to the eye, than either of those photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
Old Yeller went to his first car show on Saturday. It was actually more like a Cruise-in. No judging or awards. There were about 65 cars at the show and Yeller was the only import. Got a lot of compliments and many people had stories about Opels. I lost count on how many people said that they hadn't seen an Opel in many years.

Here's a photo that a friend of mine took at the show.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Haven’t posted anything on my project thread in a long time. thought an update is in order.

When I did the restoration back in 2016 I decided not to replace the original ball joints. During the spring check up I found the lower joins quite loose. Replaced all four ball joints, what a difference it made to the handling and feel on the road.

Over the past weekend I replaced the exhaust / intake gasket, set the valve clearance and synchronized the carbs. Just took it for a test drive. This is the best the car has ever run. Extremely smooth idle and lots of power.
I’m thinking it might be time to replace the points. I’ve put 12,000 miles on the car over the past 6 years.

Any opinions on whether I should switch to electronic ignition? I’m running the 75 distributor with the advance set to 8 degrees BTC.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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The PertronixI III is the easiest to install and has the added feature of providing multi-spark and spark amplification, plus, rev limiting(unneeded on our cars). That's what a giant MSD box does! And you get it all in a gizmo the size of a AAA battery. Never mess it or points ever again and your engine will burn fuel more efficiently. Highly recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
The PertronixI III is the easiest to install and has the added feature of providing multi-spark and spark amplification, plus, rev limiting(unneeded on our cars). That's what a giant MSD box does! And you get it all in a gizmo the size of a AAA battery. Never mess it or points ever again and your engine will burn fuel more efficiently. Highly recommended.
Do you have to change the coil? Is it powered with the lower 9 volt source, after the car starts, or do you have to change that to 12 volt?
 

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Do you have to change the coil? Is it powered with the lower 9 volt source, after the car starts, or do you have to change that to 12 volt?
No matter which electronic ignition you select (and FWIW, I personally prefer the Pertronix II, #91847), the ignitor device should be powered with a full (un-resistored) 13.5 volts (just being precise since 12 volts isn't actually accurate). Easy to install a 14 AWG wire from the switched side of the fuse box to the ignitor.

As for the coil, the power source for it and the need to change or not change the coil depends on a couple of factors.

If you use the Pertronix I (#1847), then an OEM (low resistance) coil has to be powered by the stock resistor wire. If the coil is a 3 ohm device (such as the Pertronix Flamethrower matched to the Pertronix I), then the resistor wire should be bypassed.

The Pertronix II and III can (and should) use the stock low resistance coil without the resistor supply wire. Same for a higher performance coil.

And why do I prefer the Pertronix II? Far more durable than the Pertronix I (won't fry if left turned on), auto-dwell adjustment, and cheaper than the III.

HTH
 
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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
No matter which electronic ignition you select (and FWIW, I personally prefer the Pertronix II, #91847), the ignitor device should be powered with a full (un-resistored) 13.5 volts (just being precise since 12 volts isn't actually accurate). Easy to install a 14 AWG wire from the switched side of the fuse box to the ignitor.

As for the coil, the power source for it and the need to change or not change the coil depends on a couple of factors.

If you use the Pertronix I (#1847), then an OEM (low resistance) coil has to be powered by the stock resistor wire. If the coil is a 3 ohm device (such as the Pertronix Flamethrower matched to the Pertronix I), then the resistor wire should be bypassed.

The Pertronix II and III can (and should) use the stock low resistance coil without the resistor supply wire. Same for a higher performance coil.

And why do I prefer the Pertronix II? Far more durable than the Pertronix I (won't fry if left turned on), auto-dwell adjustment, and cheaper than the III.

HTH
Great information. Thanks for the help. I read somewhere that there is no advantage on upgrading to a high output coil? Also, should the 13.5 volt wire be fused? Your thoughts on these two questions?
 

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Great information. Thanks for the help. I read somewhere that there is no advantage on upgrading to a high output coil? Also, should the 13.5 volt wire be fused? Your thoughts on these two questions?
A high output coil is only an advantage if higher spark voltage is required. A low compression, low horsepower; small'ish carb (eg Slowex)) is unlikely to gain any horsepower or driveability from a high output coil. The opposite is, of course, true.

A bypass (13.5 volt) wire around the resistor wire to the coil, connected to the same terminal as the resistor wire, is protected by the fuse already in place.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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The multi-spark feature of the version 3 is definitely a good thing. Also, the mounting of the version 3 is totally goof proof and rock solid. The 3's sense the lobes on the diz shaft. The multi-spark self cleans your spark plugs and helps to burn the fuel more efficiently in the more primitive combustion chambers of older cars like ours. Use the ultra low resistance coil Pertronix recommends, I think it's .59 Ohms, maybe lower.
 
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