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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well if anyone who has replied to my former threads about a powerglide for an opel dont worry about it
today i spent 5 hours in sand and grease pulling an auto out of a gt and i got the whole thing for $70 from flex plate to drive shaft
this car is great only has 68k on it but is a major rust bucket
i am prob going to sell the driveshaft the u joints are good and i have a hook at the junk yard and might part it out it has good glass seats rear end and prob engine but for the body the only good piece is the rear panel which i need so it anyone is interested i will get on the ball and get it
 

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Detritus Maximus
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I'm sorry I missed your earlier post about the trans. I have a rebuilt Manta automatic (possibly changeable to a GT unit, shifter stuff is on opposite side) with two torque converters, three flexplates, and the shifter. I posted it in the for sale section a long time ago but got very little interest (which is to expected;) ).
 

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Opelbits;
Although the GM TH-180 is the same trans for both the GT and the manta, there is one difference. The shifter in a Manta attaches on the control shaft to the trans on the driver's side of the trans, in a GT it attaches on the passenger side, due to the fact the headlight cable mechanism is on the driver's side of the GT and would interfere with the auto shifter linkage.
 

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And the question begs to be asked: Why?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ha and bob said i wouldnt find one
i wish i had the dough
that would be nice on my spray motor lol
i could use a tci circlematic vb an converter delete and have a 2 speed manumatic lol
use a 4.50 rearend and shift at 50
 

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Old Opeler
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TH180/TH200

The Powerglide is a much older two speed design but can be made very strong because of the short length that two speeds allow.

TH180 is also known as "tri-matic" in Australia and has been used since about 1972 behind fours, sixes and five-litre V8s - so can be built plenty strong for Opels! Rover of England also used them behind the 215 CID Buick based alloy V8

TH200 is a more modern design still and made for exceptionally low losses - some later ones in Buicks may even have had lock-up convertors.

The TH180 and TH200 models are three-speeds of course.
 

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Now this IS interesting ...

What is a POWERGLIDE transmission and how does it differ to a normal Automatic gearbox?

My Previous vehicle has been sold to someone who wants to convert it from Manual to Automatic. Weve looked at a few solution but have found a problem making the trade off between ease of installation (No electronic gadgetry) and strenth of the gearbox. It needs to cope with 250BHP.

After a quick seach on Ebay there seems to be LOADS of GM Powerglides that may be made to fit, but they don't seem to have any External linkages or levers.

How do they work?

How do you choose reverse ?

IS this really what I should be looking at?

Thanks in advance folks.

Azzi
 

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race car stuff

The GM Powerglide transmission was GM's first automatic produced in large #'s, back in the 50's when the competition in auto's was the Chrysler Powerflite and whatever Ford tried to use that was so bad no one even remembers it. Of those very early 2 speed auto transmissions, the Powerglide was hands down the strongest and it developed a huge aftermarket support for 1/4 mile cars because they went faster without having to manually shift and 2 speeds was enough for the track. Even today, a lot of drag cars still run Powerglides because in a light car that doesn't need a really low first gear only having 1 shift in the run will still make them faster in the 1/4 mile. When the 3-speed Chrysler Torqueflite came out, a lot of heavier cars went to that before the GMTH350 came out and was found to be able to be built almost as strong.

For the street, however, they powerglides not practicle for something you want to really drive around. If you're in the UK I would look for a 2.3 Diesel equipped late model 2wd Frontera or an early 90's straight-6 Omega, as these have 4-speed automatics with overdrive and a nice low first gear, and will bolt to the CIH motors. For a 3-speed in the UK look for a Carlton, they will probably pay you to take the transmission.
 

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Actually the auto trannies came out in the late 30s and early 40s. Cheverolet had the PowerGlide, Buick had the DynaFlow, I don't remember what Pontiac had, I think maybe it was the TurboGlide, and I don't know what the Cadillac was called. They were all the same except for the Buick which used different internals and you could not feel it shift gears, but could tell by the change in engine RPM. About that same time, Chrysler came out with a torque convertor clutch system that you could leave in 3rd gear with the clutch pedal out and it behaved just like an automatic tranny, except it would stay in whatever gear you had selected, but you could also use it like a manual tranny, you just couldn't spin the tires if you dumped the clutch.

Ron
 

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Re: TH180/TH200

GTJIM said:
The Powerglide is a much older two speed design but can be made very strong because of the short length that two speeds allow.

TH180 is also known as "tri-matic" in Australia and has been used since about 1972 behind fours, sixes and five-litre V8s - so can be built plenty strong for Opels! Rover of England also used them behind the 215 CID Buick based alloy V8

TH200 is a more modern design still and made for exceptionally low losses - some later ones in Buicks may even have had lock-up convertors.

The TH180 and TH200 models are three-speeds of course.


SO, can you verify that TH200 actually had lock-up converter, what year(s) and engines used with? Is the TH200 converter interchangeable with the TH180? Inquiring minds want to KNOW!

:confused:
 

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namba209 said:
Actually the auto trannies came out in the late 30s and early 40s. Chevrolet had the PowerGlide, Buick had the DynaFlow, I don't remember what Pontiac had, I think maybe it was the TurboGlide, and I don't know what the Cadillac was called. They were all the same except for the Buick which used different internals and you could not feel it shift gears, but could tell by the change in engine RPM. About that same time, Chrysler came out with a torque convertor clutch system that you could leave in 3rd gear with the clutch pedal out and it behaved just like an automatic tranny, except it would stay in whatever gear you had selected, but you could also use it like a manual tranny, you just couldn't spin the tires if you dumped the clutch.

Ron
Cadillac/Oldsmobile/Pontiac used early version Hydramatic . . . also used in Lincolns of those years (up to ~'53), oddly enough.
:eek:
 

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Re: race car stuff

oldopelguy said:
The GM Powerglide transmission was GM's first automatic produced in large #'s, back in the 50's when the competition in auto's was the Chrysler Powerflite and whatever Ford tried to use that was so bad no one even remembers it. Of those very early 2 speed auto transmissions, the Powerglide was hands down the strongest and it developed a huge aftermarket support for 1/4 mile cars because they went faster without having to manually shift and 2 speeds was enough for the track. Even today, a lot of drag cars still run Powerglides because in a light car that doesn't need a really low first gear only having 1 shift in the run will still make them faster in the 1/4 mile. When the 3-speed Chrysler Torqueflite came out, a lot of heavier cars went to that before the GMTH350 came out and was found to be able to be built almost as strong.

For the street, however, they powerglides not practicle for something you want to really drive around. If you're in the UK I would look for a 2.3 Diesel equipped late model 2wd Frontera or an early 90's straight-6 Omega, as these have 4-speed automatics with overdrive and a nice low first gear, and will bolt to the CIH motors. For a 3-speed in the UK look for a Carlton, they will probably pay you to take the transmission.
THAT would be Ford-O-Matics and Merc-O-Matics, though Lincolns used Hydramatics, sub-contracted or under license, I don't recall!
 

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Thanks for the memory jog Otto, even though I worked on those cars as a teen, I just didn't remember the names. One thing I do remember was the auto trannies back then did not compare to a manual for pure acceleration. There was just too much slippage in the tranny, hence the nickname PowerSlide, as in slip and slide. They were especially bad in the I-6 Chevrolets. No power to turn the torques convertors and no lock-up convertors either. What was really bad then was the Oldsmobile came out with a rompin' stompin' V-8 and you could only get that engine with the HydraMatic. The Olds Rocket Power engine was the first choice in the hot rod scene with dual 2 barrel carbs and dual exhaust.

Ron
 

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Re: race car stuff

oldopelguy said:
For the street, however, they powerglides not practicle for something you want to really drive around. If you're in the UK I would look for a 2.3 Diesel equipped late model 2wd Frontera or an early 90's straight-6 Omega, as these have 4-speed automatics with overdrive and a nice low first gear, and will bolt to the CIH motors. For a 3-speed in the UK look for a Carlton, they will probably pay you to take the transmission.
The Power house is the Cavalier 2.5 V6 Engien which has the diffrent Bellhousing to the CIH Engine. Luckily its the same as the 1800/2000 OHC and the rest of the XE engine range.

As for gearboxes, weve looked at the 1800 Manta Box, but have decided its just not going to handle the 250Lb of torque this engine is pushing out and its only a 3 speed Auto. On the other side of the scale we have the 4 Speed Omega Auto box, 4 gears but a 50+ Wire Harness and 3 ECU's to control the traction control etc.....

Were looking for something in the middle, Strong, 4 gears and simple to fit. Were hoping a Late 2.0 Carlton box will do, but havn't found one yet.

Anyone else any suggstions? But it has to be for the OHC engine and not the CIH.
 

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namba209 said:
Thanks for the memory jog Otto, even though I worked on those cars as a teen, I just didn't remember the names. One thing I do remember was the auto trannies back then did not compare to a manual for pure acceleration. There was just too much slippage in the tranny, hence the nickname PowerSlide, as in slip and slide. They were especially bad in the I-6 Chevrolets. No power to turn the torques convertors and no lock-up convertors either. What was really bad then was the Oldsmobile came out with a rompin' stompin' V-8 and you could only get that engine with the HydraMatic. The Olds Rocket Power engine was the first choice in the hot rod scene with dual 2 barrel carbs and dual exhaust.

Ron
Actually, quad 2-barrel Strombergs, if memory serves . . . and the Rochester 4GC and Carter WCFB were the first "stock" 4-barrel carbs offered on GM's OHV V-8's.

GM's 50's to mid-60's "Stock" multiple carb offerings began:
Buick - 2 quads in 1964
Cadillac - 2 quads in 1955
Chevrolet - 2 quads in 1956; FI in 1957; 3 deuces in 1958
Corvette - 2 quads in 1956; FI in 1957
Oldsmobile - 3 deuces (J-2 engine) in 1958 only
Pontiac - 2 quads in 1956 only; 3 deuces in 1958; FI in 1958 only
 

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Hey guys, let's try to keep this thread even a LITTLE bit Opel-related. After you all have a chance to read the various trivia about 40 year old domestic automatic transmissions, I will clean this thread up a bit

So, the question was asked: "Is there a PowerGlide that fits the Opel CIH engine?" And the answer was "yes". That doesn't surprise me, as we once had a '68 Epic Envoy (aka Vauxhall Viva, related in a Corporate sense to the Opel) that had the old two-speed "Slip and Slide PowerGlide". Tough as nails, to the extent that it would tolerate being dropped into "L" (as in Lock-out, not Low) and force it into first gear at ANY speed. Kind of like locking up the e-brake at 60 mph, which was the top speed, what with only two forward gears and a 1.1 litre engine.

But the question still remains: why would you want a two speed PowerGlide behind a 75 or 100 HP CIH engine, when the three speed TH 180 is so readily available? I can see using the PowerGlide if you are installing a big, torquey V8, and want to drag race it. But for any engine up to 150 ft-lbs of torque, more ratios are better. So the Getrag rules, and a 4-speed OD Auto-box would be pretty good too, if one was available. Which doesn't seem to be the case on this side of the pond.

JM2CW
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
well for me i am build a cih that will handle up to 200 shot of nitrous
and powerglide would suck behind a stock opel
now to azzi
what engine is it a ecotec enigne or what if so look on ebay.de under opel getriebe there were some ecotec rwd cars with 5 speed but for an auto it might be a 4l30e which is basically a 4 speed 180 they r strong bwm used them for a will and isuzu and honda and some on and so forth
now a th200 for a chevette will bolt to a opel cih
cept for top bellbolts you have to open the hole up towards each other now the prob the converter has a much larger pilot that the 180 so you would need to open up the hole in the flexplate spacer and possibly the crank i dk im not there yet useless someone will kindly measure the size of the hole in the back of their crank for the pilot bearing
ok that settled the chevetter has a slighty larger converter bolt pattern no prob though if you get a converter that uses a bolt and nut not just a bolt
ok lets see what else


o the th200 and th200c both use a tv cable like a 700r4 and has critical adjustment
im not worried with my setup because in using a holley 2 barrel and brackets are readily available now i have been told but havent looked that the th200 is the same length as the 180 but i dk
uses the same slip yoke though dipstick might be a challenge um linkage on wrong side im using a b&m meagshifter so np
 
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