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Detritus Maximus
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Bob needs to update that article anyway. It’s 20 years out of date.
That may be so. But 20 years ago is is still 30 years newer than our cars....
 
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Detritus Maximus
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I searched all over the place and the price that OGTS sells the Weber Snorkel kit for is actually 25% cheaper($149) than the best price I found($195). You still need to buy a K+N or Spectre style filter. You can get Spectre ones for about $30.

As I recall, the outer diameter of that base plate is 5 1/8".
Since most carbs used on 70s and earlier US cars also had a 5 1/8" aircleaner flange, that base could be used to mount any number of aftermarket aircleaners onto a DGV or DGS series Weber type carb. There are also spacers to lift an aircleaner higher, like if you wanted it to stick above the hood.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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15,903 Posts
As I recall, the outer diameter of that base plate is 5 1/8".
Since most carbs used on 70s and earlier US cars also had a 5 1/8" aircleaner flange, that base could be used to mount any number of aftermarket aircleaners onto a DGV or DGS series Weber type carb. There are also spacers to lift an aircleaner higher, like if you wanted it to stick above the hood.

I actually have a Weber snorkle kit round baseplate, but I chopped off the center bracket thingie that has the hole for the bolt that holds the muffin cover on. I was trying to repurpose it to fit on a side draft:

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Font
Wood Motor vehicle Steering wheel Table Window
Wood Watch Tool Bicycle part Rim


It measures 5.25". I measured it because I found an affordable snorkle cover made by Spectre in cast aluminum for $90 that fits a 5.125" base, so 1/8" too small, possibly file-able to make it work. But my base would need to be repaired somehow to hold the cover on:


Bicycle part Auto part Automotive exhaust Gas Nickel
 

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Premium Member
1970, Opel GT’j
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4 Posts
Hi guys so I was wondering if this idea would work. I have a Weber 32/36 and the square air filter that sits right on the carb. I was wondering if i cut the front of the hood “bubble” that it would be a cold air intake. And then I could figure something out if it rains like a little flap or something but I am not worried about that. Would this mod be a waste of my time or would it actually work? Right now I am running my GT without a hood since one of my hood hinges are rusted. My hood isn’t that great but it also isn’t that bad. I have a super nice orange hood that I could put on if I don’t like it.

What do you guys think about this idea. And If anyone has a crappy hood near Fort Wayne Indiana let me know.

Thanks Sam
View attachment 440996
Here is a picture of. My hood.
 

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RyanY
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5 Posts
A couple things to point out:

The middle of the hood is an aerodynamically bad place to put any sort of air intake because it's a low pressure area. When a vehicle is moving air bunches up and creates high pressure at the front of the car and at the base of the windshield - those are good places to take ambient temp outside air from. In the middle of the hood air is flowing quickly over the car and is comparatively low pressure, which makes it a bad location for an air intake.

Far too many people don't understand that an open-element air filter under the hood is not a cold air intake, it's actually a hot air intake because it's breathing in the air that's just been through the 230+ degree radiator plus any other heat exchangers (a/c condenser, oil cooler, trans cooler, etc) that may exist on the front of the car. Shrouding or ducting the air filter so it's receiving ambient temperature air from outside the engine bay is the only way you're going to see any benefit from the less-restrictive air filter.
 

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I’m not the handiest when it comes to fabricating add ons to my GT. Some of the people on our site who’s craftsmanship is much more impressive than mine could make something like what I’ve done look a lot more professional. But it gets the job done and it’s safely constructed.

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I’m thrilled that I have found a way to keep my K&N box filter. Also keeping the carb cooler as well.

Behind this duct made from insulated DEI heat shielding is an inexpensive 200 cfm fan controlled by a temperature sensor insulated and mounted on the float bowl, it takes care of the hot air that builds up under the hood while the car isn’t moving, or moving too slow to have enough fresh cold air circulating around the carburetor. It supplies plenty of air being thrown at the carburetor at those low rpm moments instead of the 140+° air under the hood. I can just lift the insulated duct right out of there when working under the hood.
As mentioned earlier air cools right down on its own once the car gets moving and the temps come down on their own and the fan cycles off.

It gets its air from in front of the radiator just as the cool air intake designed set up does.


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The Young One
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I’m not the handiest when it comes to fabricating add ons to my GT. Some of the people on our site who’s craftsmanship is much more impressive than mine could make something like what I’ve done look a lot more professional. But it gets the job done and it’s safely constructed.

View attachment 441257

I’m thrilled that I have found a way to keep my K&N box filter. Also keeping the carb cooler as well.

Behind this duct made from insulated DEI heat shielding is an inexpensive 200 cfm fan controlled by a temperature sensor insulated and mounted on the float bowl, it takes care of the hot air that builds up under the hood while the car isn’t moving, or moving too slow to have enough fresh cold air circulating around the carburetor. It supplies plenty of air being thrown at the carburetor at those low rpm moments instead of the 140+° air under the hood. I can just lift the insulated duct right out of there when working under the hood.
As mentioned earlier air cools right down on its own once the car gets moving and the temps come down on their own and the fan cycles off.

It gets its air from in front of the radiator just as the cool air intake designed set up does.


View attachment 441256
That is a cool idea!
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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15,903 Posts
Cub's idea has merit. On our cars, the need to suck cold air into the engine isn't so important, but doing everything you can do to cool off the carb itself is VERY important. Our cars have a big problem with the exhaust heat baking our carbs to the point that the fuel in the carb boils and vaporizes. Your engine wants micro-droplets of fuel and dislikes fuel in a gas-like vaporous state, hence the term "vapor lock". Cub's idea of a 12V muffin fan constantly blowing air from the cooler front of the radiator is an excellent idea which delivers cooler air for the carb to suck in and provides a cool breeze to the exterior of the carb to cool it down.
 
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