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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! Does any one know if i could change the F10 gearbox on my kadett D 1.3N with an F16 5speed gearbox?Will it fit?
And another question.. I think the F10 4 speed gearbox is the standard gearbox for the kadett D, but does any one know why when i'm driving on 4th gear(the last gear) and i reach 100km/h the engine revvs at about 4500 rpm, which is to much so that's why i never drive faster then 80km/h and that's why i wan't to change the gearbox, but why are the gears so short on my f10?
 

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Old Opeler
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Hello! That sounds like Front Wheel Drive stuff you are talking about - all the cars here are the earlier Rear wheel drive Opels - the FWD models were not imported into the USA. THe last Opels in the uSA were the 1975 Manta models.

However I have a 1987 Opel Ascona 2.0i front wheel drive here in New Zealand and we have Vectras here plus Astras, Calibras and a few Omegas

As I understand it all the FWD gearboxes will interchange in the FWD Opel range - except the models that use the Isuzu motors.

Hope that helps - but I don't know much about the front wheel drive models either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well yes it is a front wheel drive and was made from 1979 till 1983 i think.Here you can check some history if you are interested:
http://www.kadett.freehomepage.com/about.html
The engine is 1.3 N DOHC Carburettor and is german. It is 60 HP. The current gearbox is F10. The other one F16 that I want to put is probably like your Ascona's gearbox or an Astra or Vectra. The Omega I think is rear wheel drive. Don't know about the calibra, should be rear wheel drive because it's kind a sports car.
Anyway.. The only concern that it won't fit are the drive axels actually I'm not sure about the exact term - the metal bars that connect the wheels with the differential of the gear box (that make the wheel turn forward or backword and make the car go). I too have hurd that they are interchangable, but that's my only concern. Have you hurd something about that?
 

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Old Opeler
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"Drive axels" is near enough - maybe we would call them "drive shafts" but it is the same thing.

Had a look at the web site and the history of the Opel Kadett D - thanks for putting the link to it in your posting.

You have woken up my memory _ the drive axles have two different splines on the end that goes into the gearbox. There are two types with different numbers of spline teeth. I don't know which one is which though as I have never had my Ascona pulled to bits. I know it has the F16 gearbox though.

Hope That Helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's what I have hurd too and that what my concern was about. I know that on the Kadett E (or also know as teardrop i think in England they call it that way) Produced from 84 till 88-89, originaly fitted with a 4 speed gearbox (unfortunately don't know if it was an F10), to put a 5 speed gearbox you had to change the drive shafts. Is there any way that I could count the number of the splines teeth of the new gearbox and those on the car drive shafts whithout removing it? I've looked all over the internet but couldn't find enaugh information.
thanks again.
 

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Vauxhall Workshop Manual

I hunted out my Vauxhall Cavalier workshop manual (same as Opel Asconas) and the gearbox section lists the F10 and F16 series gearboxes.

THe F10 (fitted to 1.3 up to 1982); F10.4W (standard ratio fourspeed) and F10.5W (standard ratio fivespeed) both fitted to 1.3 from 1982 all seem to be interchangable. Final drive ratio 4.18:1 and 4.29:1

The F16; F16.4W/5W and F16.5C have different gear ratios - in particular the final drive (or "diff" ratio) is different. (3.74:1 3.74:1 and 3.94:1 respectively).

I think the 1.3 would struggle a bit with the different final drive ratio but if that is all you can find they should fit.

THe only way I canthink of to check the number of splines on the drive shafts is to pop them out and count them.

The left hand drive shaft sounds harder to remove than the right hand one.

"A tool will be required for insertion between the transmission casing and the inner drieshaft joint. A flat steel bar with a god champher on one end will serve. Drive the tool into the gap between the joint and casing to release the shaft snap-ring from the differential."

It looks like the drive shaft is only held into the gearbox by a round wire snap ring on the end of the splines and the axle is simply pulled out to get it apart.

I got my manual from EBay in the U.K. and it only cost GBP2.00 - plus postage around the world of course! HTH
 
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