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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Opinions please: Should I . . . and with what?

:confused:
 

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I have to ask. Why would you want to?
 

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An engine paint might be okay....but I also wonder why? If you really want it a color, powder coating might be a better option, but it wont dissipate heat as well. I would just leave it stock. Seems like your kindof asking for trouble.
 

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I like to polish the inside down to a 320-grit finish. Cleans up real well and aids oil drainback. FWIW.
 

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Opel Junkie
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paint in oil pan

when we build an aircraft engine, we absolutely do not paint inside of the engine at all. any bolt that passes through an oil galley does not get plated. the reason? to keep any foreign matter out of the oil.

if you're worried about rust, keep in mind that oil is a great rust inhibitor. the inside of the pan will not rust unless the car sits for a loooong time. shame on you if it does sit!!

the crank, cam, rockers, etc are all steel, and you would never paint those, and they don't rust.

hope this helps.

mike
 

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Painting inside the oilpan makes the oil run off quicker, it is used by most diesel manufacturers that I'm familiar with (I see it every day in our Cummins truck engines).
There are really neat other (and more effective) ways to aid oil control. Try a "scraper". This really works, adds horsepower to any high revving engine. Has to help reduce emissions, too.
I recently saw one advertised on e-bay, it looked identical to the one we built for Speedway GT. I was so impressed I even printed it in case I needed to pass it on. I don't see a web site there, but try searching for "ishihara-johnson crank scraper".
If that doesn't work let me know, I could scan and attach it.
 

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Sorry, I forgot to answer part of your question "with what?"
Last time I built a bad 427 I used a GE product called "glyptal" that was a reddish rattle can spray paint used in electric motors.
That was the tip from the HP book called How to Hot Rod the Big Block Chevy. It must have stuck good, the engine still runs strong, hasn't blown up yet after 15 years of very rare use...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Uh . . . DUH!

Mental lapse . . . senior moment . . . what was that again?

Interesting replies though . . .

;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bob's method . . .

RallyBob said:
I like to polish the inside down to a 320-grit finish. Cleans up real well and aids oil drainback. FWIW.
Yeah, that's what I ended up doing . . . was just lazy and wanted to avoid expending some "perhaps unnecessary" elbow grease. There appears to be a bit of reticence to use this as one gets older . . . sorry.
 

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After much searching and debating, I guess this question should go here. The first picture shows the oil pan after removal. What are the little "Hazy" lines and bumps caused by? At first I thought I had a pan that was cracking, or was about to.The second picture is after cleaning it up and polishing it with 120 grit which made the surface a lot smoother. Is/was this normal? I also noticed what appears to be a weld apx 2" long on the end of the panI found the same thing (Hazing) in the timing chain cover? Thanks, Jarrell
 

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Jarrell, I've seen that a lot on my aluminum motorcycle engines and on the model racing boat engines, although usually it's on the outside. In my non professional opinion it's nothing more than flashing from the casting process. Unless it breaks loose inside the engine, which it is not prone to do, it should cause no problem. But I like RallyBob's idea to at least smooth down the interior, if for no other reason, than what he states, to aid oil draining down the sides of the surfaces. HTH.

BTW, the CD is in the mail. Firgured I'd say it here than do the PM thing. Saves time. :haha:
 

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boomerang opeler
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just a wild thought jeff but
crystaline structure of steel highlighted by oil erosion of the pan on start up when pan is not covered in oil and so throw off from spinning crank hits direct on to steel stamping :)
now i will go and have a dried frog pill and a lie down
 

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A lot of new steel oil pans come from the factory powder coated . Just to add my 2-cents:cool:
 

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soybean said:
What are the little "Hazy" lines and bumps caused by?
It's just casting 'flash'. Totally normal for an Opel, but I still like to sand it down. I've seen bigger pieces break off and float around in the oil. It's all part of the blueprinting process!
 

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Speaking of prepping an oilpan, what is the best way to remove all the cork gasket from the top edge? With the raised bead around the top (to aid sealing) you can't get it with a gasket scraper. The cork material is hard to get off.
 

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Steve, they make some spray on gasket remover that I have had good luck with. When working with some of the newer engines the manuals state to use this stuff and a plastic scraper when preping the head gasket surfaces, no metal tools! The finishes are that critical.

DAN
 

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Thanks. I am not too concerned with the head mating surfaces, I am having them cleaned up at the machine shop. :)

I didn't realize that gasket removal stuff would work on the cork. I will try it.
 

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If that doesn't work, Ive had good luck with a wire wheel in a air grinder with the pressure turned down. HTH, Jarrell
 
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