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Okay Guys, here's another topic for strong opinions.....

What plugs are the best for high performance use in our Opels? I don't just mean brand, I mean number also. And how about type now that they have these 2 and 4 electrode plugs out there?

What got me thinking about all this? I changed the plugs in my daughter's Corolla this past weekend. 100,000 miles and the factory plugs (Denso) still looked good. They were a 2 electrode platinum plug. Remember when you had to change plugs every 15,000, and they would be shot?

I am currently running Bosch Platinum WP7BP in my 11:1 2.0. They work fine, and should out last me with my MSD ignition firing them. They just don't "read" very well. I would like to try something different when I put my side draft on to help in my tuning.

Ideas?

James

installing roller rockers tonight!
 

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Just a personal opinion here, as many people seem to have very different likes/dislikes with plugs (as well as oil, filters, etc.)

Platinums I've found to be great with stock points or with a basic Pertronix system on stock/near stock engines. But for true high-po use and racing, they are not ideal. Same with most 'gadget' style plugs, with 2, 4,....10, 50 (slightly sarcastic here!)....multiple electrodes.

A 'regular' Bosch plug or a Denso, or NGK (with the appropriate heat range for the application) is fine.
I personally have had the most consistent performance with the NGK's....YMMV.

Bob

http://www.opelgt.com/forums/showpost.php?p=32252&postcount=273
 

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James for what it's worth I like the NGKs too. I figured since our motors are getting to be really similar I might share that. Are you doing a SSD or DSD weber set up? I'm jelous my rollers only just shipped.
 

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WR7BP, James?

N61WP said:
Okay Guys, here's another topic for strong opinions.....

What plugs are the best for high performance use in our Opels? I don't just mean brand, I mean number also. And how about type now that they have these 2 and 4 electrode plugs out there?

What got me thinking about all this? I changed the plugs in my daughter's Corolla this past weekend. 100,000 miles and the factory plugs (Denso) still looked good. They were a 2 electrode platinum plug. Remember when you had to change plugs every 15,000, and they would be shot?

I am currently running Bosch Platinum WP7BP in my 11:1 2.0. They work fine, and should out last me with my MSD ignition firing them. They just don't "read" very well. I would like to try something different when I put my side draft on to help in my tuning.

Ideas?

James

installing roller rockers tonight!
Probably meant WR7BP (old designation), 4232 for 4-pack (new designation).

I'm with Bob on using "standard", non-resistive plugs in modified or race engines and have had very good results using Bosch "Super" W7BC (7597) and W6BC (7593, hotter) copper-core plugs in all my engines. They specify 0.9mm (.035") gap right on the box and they're still only 99¢ each and fairly readily available, more so than the platinums. With "boosted" ignition, I run 1mm (.040") gaps . . . works better.

HINT: a little "racers" trick (from my Chevy days) I use is to modify the ground electrode on my plugs to "unshroud" the spark, which helps flame front propagation in the combustion chamber, see attached pic. Requires nothing but a little "elbow grease" and some time. Worth the effort . . . gives a bit of an edge in the ignition department and every little bit helps, right?! ;)
 

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well they seem to work.

NGK 2667

SPARK PLUG NGK IRIDIUM IX

http://www.ngk.com/results_app.asp?AAIA=1226461

it has a projected tip too. go to the page and do a roll over for the specs. I run mine at 45 for a gap do the Jacobs ultra coil which calls for .15 over on gap settings.

in case there is anyone like me who didn't know what iridium plugs are

Iridium is a precious metal that is 6 times harder and 8 times stronger than platinum, it has a 1,200(=F) higher melting point than platinum and conducts electricity better. This makes it possible to create the finest wire center electrode ever. Prior till now, platinum had been favored for long life or performance spark plugs due to its high melting point, also the technology did not exist to machine and bond iridium on a spark plug electrode(at least in a cost effective manner). Iridium industrial spark plugs have been around for years, but still sells for over a hundred dollars per plug. Just now is the technology available to effectively use iridium in a spark plug for automotive applications. The strength, hardness and high melting point of iridium allows NGK to manufacture there iridium ultra-fine wire center electrode to 0.7mm. One of the finest firing points in the industry! (Thus far there has been no problems reported regarding use of iridium plugs with nitrous oxide.)
 

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My plugs fouled on jacobs, quickly and

.. then the coil popped, cracked and shot out the hot oil. I'm suspected i did not have the resistor coil wire and susect it killed the coil or could it just could have been a deffected coil. The car ran like a mean street machine at first but then became sluggish. Sorry, I have a couple of post. I just never heard of a coil getting that hot. Fishing for a answer if anyone ever ran into that.

Thanks,
Blake
 

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I haven't had a lot of experience wit the NGK Iridiums (BPR6HIX), but I do have them in teh Manta I am doing now.. they seem to be really getting a good spark. Will know how they hold up to the Bosch Platinums (My old favorite) once I get some mileage on the engine.

As for your coil..

THe wiring should have TWO circuits for the coil.

One at 12v(+) that is a black wire I believe. It runs from teh starter tot he coil to run it at 12V during starting.

The other is ther resistor wire (Clear) It should run the coil at 8v (or something like that dont have specs handy).

Running the coil at 12V constantly will fry it.. If you dont have (or have fried it) a resistor wire anymore, you can use a resistor block from a 79 Dodge and just wire it up as shown. (Ignore colors, this is for the EZ Wiring harness)

Charles
 

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GoinManta Thanks for the info,

Its been a long time since I played with this car, but after searching on this site its seems like alot of people have had trouble with that resistor wire. In the cobwebs of my mind, I remember some clear wire and replacing it, it was damaged somehow. I will add a resistor to it (or a relay if possible), I don't like the idea of the coil getting hot just listening to the radio or something. I did fry alot of points before the Jacobs system was added. It will be some time since i get chance to do the work and write back. Thanks again for the advice.

Blake
 

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Sounds like you replaced the resistor wire with a standard wire alright..

Simply plug in a ballast resistor block and you will be fine.. (Its $4 from Advance Auto). Or replace the coil with a coil with the ballast built in..

Charles
 

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Resistance is NOT futile . . .

stockboy1972 said:
Its been a long time since I played with this car, but after searching on this site its seems like alot of people have had trouble with that resistor wire. In the cobwebs of my mind, I remember some clear wire and replacing it, it was damaged somehow. I will add a resistor to it (or a relay if possible), I don't like the idea of the coil getting hot just listening to the radio or something. I did fry alot of points before the Jacobs system was added. It will be some time since i get chance to do the work and write back. Thanks again for the advice.

Blake
I hope you meant "(AND a relay, if possible)" . . . relay by itself will not help you. :(
 

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Has anyone mastered the right resistance for a hi out put coil using a mds box?

Thanks, Guys.

I learned allot from your input. I just want to make sure I don' burn up the next one. I would rather under supply voltage to my coil than over supply it so it last forever. The last coil was rated at 60,000 volts. I've seen different voltages all over this board. Is there a safe Resistor ohm rating and voltage rating that someone has tested and pasted the test of time using zero resistance Hi energy coil w/mds, preferably jacobs system.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Coil and MSD box.

I strongly recommend the Jigowatt 1,000,000 volt coil however. It will absolutely power anything short of the sun for ignition purposes. ;-) Seriously, however, there is no genuine reason to run a coil with much over 30,000 volts.

I run nothing but the MSD-5 box with a Pertronix with a Bosch Red coil. I've never had any ignition problems with the coil, box or the ignition. One thing I do recommend is to open the sparkplug gap by .005 over stock to about .035-.040. This will give a larger spark exposure. I use the WR7BP Bosch Copper core plug and have had no problems.

Good luck.
 

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W7BC Bosch plugs?

David McCollam said:
I strongly recommend the Jigowatt 1,000,000 volt coil however. It will absolutely power anything short of the sun for ignition purposes. ;-) Seriously, however, there is no genuine reason to run a coil with much over 30,000 volts.

I run nothing but the MSD-5 box with a Pertronix with a Bosch Red coil. I've never had any ignition problems with the coil, box or the ignition. One thing I do recommend is to open the sparkplug gap by .005 over stock to about .035-.040. This will give a larger spark exposure. I use the WR7BP Bosch Copper core plug and have had no problems.

Good luck.
I have been using that setup, with the exception of using a stock, "tan-top" round coil, on my GT's flat-top piston engine that I converted to '75 FI since '78, so enough said about that.

I think you meant W7BC plugs though, Dave . . . "C", as in copper and no "R", as in resistive, EMI noise reduction. WR7BP are the old Bosch Platinum plug identifier, the only platinum Bosch type available with the correct thread reach (.460"), BTW. I DO add the following mod to the plug however:
 

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BTW, what OHM coil would you need, if you wanted to rid yourself of the ballast resistor totally. Stop me if I am wrong, but if I got a coil setup for 12V a ballast would be unneccesary.. correct?

This would be for a Pertronix not a set of points.

Also anyone try the 91847A Ignitor II pertronix.. it says its only for the 009 aftermarket Bosch distributor for the VW. Isn't that basically the Opel distributor? The Ignitor II unlike the old pertronix we are used too supposedly is adaptive to the engines needs. I am interested in adding it to my sons car.

Charles
 

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Charles,
If you get rid of that resistor wire and run a new wire you can use the pertronix flamethrower coils with your ignitor. It's a good setup from what I've heard. Bugstuff has pretty decent deals on them at Carlisle.
Todd
 

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I don't have a resistor wire anymore.. I have a resistor block.. as I have rewired my whole car with a EZ harness. :) The question is which OHM to use if I don't run a resistor wire. There are three versions of the flame thrower coil. 0.6 OHM, 1.5 OHM, and 3.0 OHM. Don't want to get the wrong one and have it blow up on me as well. They also have a new coil called the XTREME its 60,000v.

I already have a Pertronix Ignitor in the car. I am trying to find out if the Pertronix Ignitor II system fits.. I am getting conflicting information.

That said I am on the phone with BugStuff now, to find out what they know.

Also thinking of getting a MSD, Pertronix has one now that works with the Ignitors.. called Second Strike.

Figured if I got all that, the spark on the Manta would be about as hot as it can get.. and efficent.

Charles
 

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I've been looking into this lately as well Charles (but went with a Bosch Red instead). I think for 4 cylinder applications they recommend 3 ohm coils, and 1.5 ohm coils for racing. It'll be interesting to see what Bugstuff says. Perhaps heat becomes a problem with the 1.5 ohm versions as a daily driver?
 
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