Opel GT Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, my GT was hit-and-run at some point yesterday. I got home, and there was a gigantic dent in the passenger door.

Luckily for me, there is only one tiny scratch...but the dent is huge.

I was thinking of trying to pull/knock-out the dent myself. Does anyone have any tips?

Would I be better off opening up the door panel, and trying to bang it out with a rubber mallet...or should I try using a suction cup of some sort? Thanks.

It's a sad day here...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,229 Posts
Pulling a dent out of a GT door can run the full range of difficulty depending on the size and location of the dent and if there is any noticable creases.
I'd try it from the outside using a suction cup with a handle on it. (available at most auto supply stores) If you hit it from the inside, you run the risk of further dents and stretching the metal too far beyond the original surface. Put even pulling pressure on the handle. You may need to have someone gently tap around the edge of the dent with a rubber hammer. (Wrap the head in a soft cloth.) Be careful to 'work' it out slowly and don't pull it beyond it's original surface. With a little finese and a lot of luck, you may end up with just the scratch to repair. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
The heat/cold thing will work well on hail damage, but for a large dent, what I call a pressure dent, the key is to find the locks, these are found at the edges of the dent and show themselves as high spots. With the way the metal curves on the doors, I would bet that the main locks are located at the top and bottom of the dent. The key is to take your time and do not strike the metal (high spots) without having some kind of pulling device (suction cup) (toilet plunger might work) pulling on the low area.
The basic principal of metalwork is as follows.
Think of a pond of still water, now drop a rock into the water and see the waves flowing away from the impact area. the waves flow down and then higher than the surrounding water and drop back again. When a car is hit, the same thing happens with one main difference. When the wave moves away from the impact area it stops with the wave in the high position and does not flow back to level. so, the way to remove the damage is to pull up on the low area with a suction cup and hit the high areas(locks) with a hammer. If the dent is large, try a rubber mallet on the high spots. the key is to hit the locks as square as possible, first one and then the other(s) working your way around the damaged area, pulling all the while.
about 80% of the damage should come out right away.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,802 Posts
I'm too cheap

I like the basketball in the door method myself. Deflate the ball, insert needle, insert deflated ball into door, and gently reinflate the ball. Sometimes you also need a piece of wood or scrap metal to reinforce the inner panel where the inside of the ball is inflating against.

Remember to start at the edges and work your way in. As long as there are no creases, and the air pressure is applied slowly, this trick usually works great for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks for all the advice guys! :)

I tried on Saturday to pull this. I bought a rubber mallett and an 80lb. suction cup.

There were two of us working on this, he would pull, and I would bang with the mallet, unfortunately, the dent wouldn't budge :(

I haven't taken any pics of it, but maybe I will. Let's just put it this way, it's just about the whole front half of the door, and it's in about 6 inches from where it should be.

I think I'm going to just break down and take it to a paintless dent removal shop. They have much better tools than I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,127 Posts
<I think I'm going to just break down and take it to a paintless dent removal shop. They have much better tools than I have.>


I hate to sound stupid but what is a paintless dent removal shop?
I have two small creases on my back quarter that could use some work
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
there's a place up here near Boston called "Dent Wizard"

they have tools which they slide between body panels (from what I saw on a news report), and can then smooth out the dents from just about any part of the car from inside the body.

I'm not sure exactly how it works, but that's the gist of what I remember seeing.

I know people who have gone to them before, and they've been very happy with the work. I believe this place charges $100 per body panel that they straighten.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,229 Posts
JGard18 said:
there's a place up here near Boston called "Dent Wizard"
They were at the German Car Day lawn event at the Museum of Transportation (Home of our Opels on the Lawn event) a few years back. Pretty impressive.

From your description of the dent, it may be beyond their scope.:(
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,875 Posts
Dent Wizard

I have worked for Dent Wizard in Illinois for about 8 years. Opels actually have pretty thick metal compared to today's cars so Paintless Dent Removal (PDR) is iffy at best. Also cars that have been repainted or have any traces of Bondo complicate the matter. Combine that with whatever you have tried to do to the dent probably makes the end result harder to perfect. They say 80% of how well a dent will be removed is determined by the first push, and there are a lot of folks in the trade that have a hard time mastering that "first push". It's like anything else...the cost is $100 for it to be fixed...if you try to fix it first, the cost goes up to $150 to straighten out the mess you made!
The "crowns" or smiles of the dent almost always need to be knocked down before the pushes are made to remove the dent or the crowns tend to get "locked in".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have heard that dry ice will work because it causes the metal to contract and take shape in it's original stucture. I would give that a try. Just hold a pice on there for a few mins, but make sure you wear a glove that stuff is really cold.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,840 Posts
I've hear about the dry ice thing too, but never tried it.

I have used heat to pull dents. Although heat will initially cause expansion of metal, cooling it will cause the metal to shrink. I've successfully popped some decent size dents with a heat gun (not too close, careful not to burn the paint!), and a spray bottle with water in it. All without damaging the paint surface. It the metal is heated enough so that application of water will cause steam, you will successfully be able to shrink the metal.

Bob
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top