Opel GT Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been having a hard time finding rear shocks for my Manta and after combing through the entirety of the KYB catalogue I decided to roll the dice on a pair of KYB 343042 for the 3rd gen celica.

The problem is the lower bushing has way too big of an I.D. for the stock mounting bolt. It is, however large enough to insert a metal sleeve/bushing thing in there. Something with these dimensions: 5/8" OD x 0.385" ID x .120" Wall. I was hoping to use bronze for this job, but the only thing you can get in those dimensions is DOM steel tube...

So my question is, is DOM steel a bad idea because it'd be stronger than the bolt that goes through it?
Or should I just send it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
Steel is the proper material for your application.
 
  • Like
Reactions: oemoilleaks

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great! If this works out I know it'll be a big relief. rear shocks are NLA for the manta...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
I have fox body mustang rear shocks on my manta, direct fit. I think I’ve read same era thunderbird shocks work as well.
 

·
Opel Rallier since 1977
Joined
·
2,368 Posts
Yep the DOM steel will be good for that use (as would a bronze). And yes on the T-bird shocks.... look at the mid-80's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
There are so many options out there for a fox body. I am pretty sure I used early 90’s model year when I was browsing summit.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,289 Posts
Fox body rear shocks are a bit short for the Manta. They are okay if the car is extremely lowered...we used to use them for racing to keep the springs from falling off the perches.

The 1983-1988 Ford Thunderbird rear shocks were a near perfect fit. They did require shortening the inner metal sleeves and using an adapter bushing to reduce the bolt hole to 10 mm.

Unfortunately 1983-1988 Thunderbirds are apparently as rare as Opels these days. Hard to find any performance shocks anyway.
 

·
Opel Rallier since 1977
Joined
·
2,368 Posts
For the shocks you bought, the extended length is about 1.5" longer than the T-bird shock and the compressed length is 2" longer than the T-bird shock. Can't see how that is going to work as the T-bird shock is already a tad longer than the stock shocks..... you're gonna easily bottom that shock out.
Look at KYB 343162 and KG5556 (the Gas-A-Just model).... mid 80's Thunderbird as noted.

Here is the KYB chart to know the compressed and extended lengths of each.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
@Manta Rallier I went with the measurements I got from the OE shocks I pulled off the car. I was legitimately surprised to find the actual original OPEL stamped shocks on the car.

I also chose the celica ones because I feel like that car is closest in application, given its weight, size, and engine.

OE Opel Shock measurements:

14.50" compressed
24.25" extended
9.75" travel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Fox body rear shocks are a bit short for the Manta. They are okay if the car is extremely lowered...we used to use them for racing to keep the springs from falling off the perches.

The 1983-1988 Ford Thunderbird rear shocks were a near perfect fit. They did require shortening the inner metal sleeves and using an adapter bushing to reduce the bolt hole to 10 mm.

Unfortunately 1983-1988 Thunderbirds are apparently as rare as Opels these days. Hard to find any performance shocks anyway.
In the event these shocks don't work now that they're here. I was wondering what most people do when they cut their springs.. how many coils up front? how many in the back? just get newer/better springs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well here's a fun update.

I got bored and decided to get at the metal inserts that are in the OE shocks. They turned out to be the exact right size. They even have a part number! 010-016-301

433819


433820
433821

433822

433823
 

·
Opel Rallier since 1977
Joined
·
2,368 Posts
Awesome. And thanks for the real shock data.... that is 'shocking'.... But were your measurements to the top end of the upper pin? I'd have to see if that is the right way to measure them.. I just can't recall right now. You made a choice with a good long stroke.

I can't help with the springs.... I always wanted moderately higher rates but with a taller installed height so just had to go with longer, stiffer ones. (Rallying....) I do remember using ones with a slightly larger outer dameter; not a problem in the rear but I had to 'bevel' the bottom coil on the fronts to keep them in the slightly small spring pockets up front. They never flew out, even with all the crashing and bashing....This was all to use cheaper American spec springs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
I just put uncut factory springs in my car and the fox body shocks are quite a bit to short, fully extended the top of the stud is still about an inch shy of entering the hole in the body. I guess I forgot how much I had cut the original springs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
I think shocks are measured at the mounting points. Center of the lower bolt hole to the middle of the two upper bushings. If we get that length extended and compressed I’ll check around summit and strange for some options.
 

·
Opel Rallier since 1977
Joined
·
2,368 Posts
I just put uncut factory springs in my car and the fox body shocks are quite a bit to short, fully extended the top of the stud is still about an inch shy of entering the hole in the body. I guess I forgot how much I had cut the original springs
What PN? I was using the T-bird shocks in 1984..... never had such an issue. That was with a taller, straight rate spring at 240 lb/in rate for rallying; I cannot recall 100% but that spring probably had a shorter free length that the stock springs, what with not being a progressive rate and being a higher spring rate. Now if the car is up on jackstands under the body, then the rear axle can droop so much as to allow the rear axle to drop to an abnormally low position; that might be your issue with those long free length stock springs.

Your description of how to measure is what I too think is right. That is why I asked... how did the OP measure the old OEM shock lengths? If to the tip of the top stud, I think that will give a too-long length.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Rear of my car is resting on the springs, front is on jack stands under the forward jacking points. I pulled up on the socks to be sure they were fully extended. I do not know the part number but they are bilstein b6 hd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Free length, fully extended, they are 61.5mm or 24 1/4". My car is not at ride height yet so I won't yet be able to determine if they are in fact too long.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top