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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The brake pedal is stopping half way down. Seems the rear brakes are retaining pressure causing them to be locked up. Loosen the bleeder, fluids squirts out, brake pedal works once or twice. Then the rear again fails to release. Any ideas? Thanks Doug
 

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Can Opeler
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3,752 Posts
The brake pedal is stopping half way down. Seems the rear brakes are retaining pressure causing them to be locked up. Loosen the bleeder, fluids squirts out, brake pedal works once or twice. Then the rear again fails to release. Any ideas? Thanks Doug
I had the same problem, my rear brake cylinders were so crudded up they wouldn't work anymore.
Auto part Fuel line

I spent somewhere around $50 at OGTS for new rubber hoses and rear cylinders and haven't had one problem since.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Yup, the rear brake rubber hose, located just in front of the differential is probably swollen and is acting like a one way valve. This happens to them with age and is the most common problem people have with their brakes. You might as well replace the rear brake cylinders while you are at it, since they are the next most common thing to go bad. Get the bigger 3/4" ones.

Flush all of your fluid out with new fluid until it comes out clear(old fluid will be rusty colored and will have absorbed moisture from the air). This should be done once a year. Buy yourself a Power Bleeder so that you can do this job real easy all by yourself.

:yup:
 

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Opeler
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Thanks for everyone's input. I have ordered the parts. The rear brakes are definitely not returning. Hopefully this will take care of it. Thanks. Doug
If you are new to Opels, while you have the drums off, take a moment to free up and turn the two hex-heads on each backing plate and observe how they engage and adjust the brake shoes.

They each turn a cam that rides against the shoes and individually moves the shoes in or out relative to the drum. You'll need them to adjust the brakes once the drum is back on and it is worth it to familiarize yourself with them while the drums are off. HTH
 

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If you are new to Opels, while you have the drums off, take a moment to free up and turn the two hex-heads on each backing plate and observe how they engage and adjust the brake shoes.

They each turn a cam that rides against the shoes and individually moves the shoes in or out relative to the drum. ...
:yup:

While you're at it take a good look at the backing plate lands/pads.
Over the years they'll wear a nice groove into them.
You can either replace or repair them.
 

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good advice, on the subject of back brakes.

Look at the backing plate observing from under the car and you will see arrow stamped into the backing plate along the outside edge, This is there for a reason. Arrow direction indicates direction of cam travel to adjust shoes against the drum. It does make the difference on adjusting the shoes and how it effects the brake performance by how it loads the cam against the shoes against the drum setting .

Second if you are replacing the axle flex brake line, spend the extra to change the front disk brake flex lines at the same time when the system is open. Ron
 

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Can Opeler
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And while you're at it put in a new OGTS master cylinder and booster if you have some money burning in your pocket, because that's the next thing that will go wrong and break or start leaking. It sucks to have to pour brake fluid in your reservoir every 10 miles on a 200 mile drive when it does fail. Ask me how I know...
 

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Opeler
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And while your at it put in a new OGTS master cylinder and Booster if you got some money burning in your pocket, because that's the next thing that will go wrong and break or start leaking. It sucks to have to pour brake fluid in your reservoir every 10 miles on a 200 mile drive when it does fail. Ask me how I know...
After you install the new larger booster master combo do a very slow and easy test drive. DO NOT take your GT out and stomp the brakes to see how they work now.

"Seriously, this upgrade should come with a warning label."

Take a nice drive, and softly, even gently apply the brakes the first few times. Find a clear, open road, that you are alone on, before you stomp the pedal at 60 or above.

The response of the new set up takes a little getting used to.

They work almost too good.
 

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... It sucks to have to pour brake fluid in your reservoir every 10 miles on a 200 mile drive when it does fail. Ask me how I know...
During the 1500 mile road trip to the recent Tacoma Opel Gathering, my GT developed a brake leak from a sudden stomping of the brakes. The remainder of the trip required two bottles of brake fluid to get home. Fill the car with fuel, fill the brake reservoir.

I just wish the blown slave cylinder seal was in the front rather than the back. Although for safety, it's best to lose the back.
 

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I saw the adjustment system. So, I take it that someone has to adjust that from time to time.
While the rear brake pads are wearing down (this is happening VERY slowly anyway), they always reset back to the cam, and your pedal travel will get longer before the brakes grab. Adjusting these cams will take care of this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks to everyone!

Thanks for all the information. I will give an update when I get the parts. Doug
 
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