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101st Airborne 1/327 Inf
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rear wheel bolts

I need to remove the original wheel bolts and replace them with longer ones. Is there a special tool or does anyone on the site know of another way of removal short of force out by hammer?
 

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101st Airborne 1/327 Inf
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I understand the hammers role in the process but what or how did you use the vise? Did you attach it somehow to press the bolt out/loose and use the hammer to complete the extraction? I tried to use a large C clamp but could not get a good hold.
 

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I spread the jaws open a couple of inches and used it as an anvil to hammer the studs through. That gave it a solid surface to bang against, instead of the bearing. I did the reverse to install them, just hammered them back in, although you will need help on the rear axles as the are quite hefty.
 

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Old Opeler
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Bend It!

Too much hammering on axle flanges can bend them and cause all sorts of brake drum/wheel runout and balance problems.

If you can get to a hydraulic press ( with the axles out of the diff!) then pressing the studs out with the back of the flange well supported is better than maniacal bashing!

If you must hammer them make sure the flange is well supported too. When the studs are out check the runout of the flange ( should be less than .004") If the flange has been bent by running into a curb, for instance, get it trued up before putting the new studs in and check again when they are in.

The hammer method can be helped along with a mild steel drift that has a 12mm hole drilled in one end that is just a bit shorter than the exposed threaded section of the stud - some times studs removed this way can be reused as the thread has not been mangled with the hammer!
 

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There is another, less painful method, at least on the rear axle, you can pull the studs through, by going to the hardware store and getting a heavy (size, not weight) 12 X 1.5mm hex nut and a few 12 mm flat washers. Then purchase the longest, cheapest boxed wrench or a deep inpact socket (preferably 1/2" drive) and a pull handle. Use a bar of ordinary hand soap, and rub the knurled area with the soap, then insert the stud from the back, put on washers from the front then thread nut on, and crank it till the head on the back side is flush.
 

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101st Airborne 1/327 Inf
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Rear Wheel Bolt extraction

I am a little confused. It seem like your last response is geared to inserting the replacement studs and not a kinder/gentler extraction of the original wheel bolts. Can I remove the four bolts on each rear wheel with the units still attached to the rear? Can I use a spacer with longer bolts to satisfy my problem? :confused:

By the way, BQS4 is a pretty slick ID..... No association with 007 ?

:D
 

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The only gentle way of removing the old studs, is to take the hubs off (these are the fronts, and you HAVE to remove the rotor) and remove the rear axles (which requires 4 nuts and a slide hammer) and have all 16 pressed out on an arbor press (shop press some call it) I have done several cars by removing the front hubs and hammering out the old studs and hammering in the new. I have used both methods on the rear, (1) pulling them through (which you can leave the axles in the car, but you still have to hammer the old studs out) and I have removed the rear axles and hammered them in. I'm not picking a bone with GTJim, but, I have 70K + miles on several cars that I have done this and absolutely no bearing failure or abnormal brake problems.
 

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BTW, the "BQS4" is just initials of a favorite "alter ego" of my Dad (bless his soul) It stands for:
Bolivar
Quill
Shagnasty
and since I'm the 4th of my namesake's generation, hince the "4"
 

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101st Airborne 1/327 Inf
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Rear Bolts

Thanks for all your time proven advise on the stud removal. Will try to put it into play this week.

As far as your site logon, BQS4 couldn't represent a finer person. MICAH1 represents my only son.......
 

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Old Opeler
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No Bone to Pick!

No offence taken! Just putting up the worst case scenario as I am the lad with access to night shift machine tools that ends up fixing the ones that have "gone wrong". Experience tells me that it is quicker to use a hammer and the special drift to remove them and the press to put them back in - as long as the flange is supported. If they are wound in using the thread then oil the thread with some diff oil and use a new wheel nut with the correct thread in it as these nuts are usually higher tensile steel than ordinary nuts - and they have the correct threads in them;)
 

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I was asked this question via PM:

I have two wheels that I would like to put on the rear that have a larger offset (think that is correct) than those for the front. Question: Can I/How can I remove those bolts with the axle attached to the rear???

I have not yet had to replace a wheel stud. I just haven't. I HAVE tried practising on a spare front hub, with the hammer method, and with a 4 inch vice (using it as a "press"), but I couldn't get them out. I also tried my little 12 ton hydraulic press, but it isn't wide enough to properly support the hub face. I like the idea of the arbour press, so maybe I will have to acquire one of those. There might even be enough room to use one of those on the rear hub while it is still on the car

As for removing them while on the car, there would be two issues. The first is: can you hammer (or arbour press) the studs out (will you bend/damage the hub by hammering, or is there room for the arbour press)? The second issue will be sufficient room to insert a LONGER stud (if that is your plan) in from behind. But from what Gene has indicated, it is possible for the rear hubs.

Don't be afraid of pulling the axle shafts. On later cars (post mid-'70 with the outboard retainer) you simply remove the brake drum and the four bolts securing the retaining plate to the backing plate and differential housing, and use a slide hammer (and it can be something "jerry-rigged to impart an outward impact) to pull the axle out. The earlier design requires you to remove the differential pan, and remove a circlip on the inboard end of each axle. Then do the same as above.

HTH
 

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Screen Names

Since we are all explaining the meaning of our user names.. Sparky is kind of an inside joke between me and my girlfriend. She called me that one day, and it still kind of sticks with us. She has helped me through a lot in my life, and keeps my spirits high whenever I'm having a bad day, or just frustrated with fixing my car ;) She means the world to me, so I just thought it would make a good name!
 

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Old Opeler
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Your Life!

The wheel studs hold your wheels on - do the job properly or the wheels will fall off!

The replacement studs/bolts need to be proper wheel studs of the correct size and type as the shank that presses into the flange varies considerably in size. Also the Opel Studs have a METRIC thread - which may or may not be the same as the replacement studs. Most US cars use SAE threads, lots of Japanese and European cars use metric. What ever you use then get the matching wheel nuts!

BTW "GTJIM" is probably a bit self explanatory:D
 

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Wheel Stud Installer

There is another, less painful method, at least on the rear axle, you can pull the studs through, by going to the hardware store and getting a heavy (size, not weight) 12 X 1.5mm hex nut and a few 12 mm flat washers. Then purchase the longest, cheapest boxed wrench or a deep inpact socket (preferably 1/2" drive) and a pull handle. Use a bar of ordinary hand soap, and rub the knurled area with the soap, then insert the stud from the back, put on washers from the front then thread nut on, and crank it till the head on the back side is flush.
OR you can add another tool to your collection that reduces the effort considerably, a Lisle Wheel Stud Installer. It allows the use of a regular lug nut (not the mag wheel style with a washer) and has bearings that reduces the friction making it an easier install than using the washers that Gene suggested. Granted the washer method works, is cheaper and you may already have these items at your disposal. If you do very many stud installations though it might be worth investing in.

Harold
 

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OR you can add another tool to your collection that reduces the effort considerably, a Lisle Wheel Stud Installer. It allows the use of a regular lug nut (not the mag wheel style with a washer) and has bearings that reduces the friction making it an easier install than using the washers that Gene suggested. Granted the washer method works, is cheaper and you may already have these items at your disposal. If you do very many stud installations though it might be worth investing in.


Harold
This is repeated in another thread right now, so I am also adding that info here.

In case you are interested, check here (among other places): Lisle Wheel Stud Installers 22800 - Free Shipping on Orders Over $99 at Summit Racing

Listed at $36+ at the Lisle website, but $18.62 at Rock Auto (where we sometimes get discounts, ?? now).

FWIW, the bearings Harold mentions are replaceable (info in the primary ad).

HTH -- Doug
 
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