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Not to disagree or agree with anyone, but I thought I would bring up the point of the lines on hydraulic fork lifts. They're very long and flexible and carry very high pressurized hydraulic fluid. Now, a car's brake system and a fork lift use hydraulics in a different way, so maybe they're not comparable.
As someone who regularly make and replaces hydraulic hoses on fork lifts, front end loaders and bulldozer this comparison isn't realistic.

You can't compare the tiny short stroke of your masterylinder witch displaces only a few ounces of oil per stroke to a 10 gallons per minute hydraulic pump systems.
 

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And we have to keep in mind that if the line ID is larger, then there will be more fluid volume inside the line, and the fluid compressibility becomes a bigger and bigger factor.
Will there be?

Fluid doesn't compress, the containment vessel stretches.

If you use a larger ID line, won't you be able to have the same flow rate at a lower pressure, and thus lower stress and stretch on the vessel (the lines)?

There are so many maybe-wrong ways to think about it :p
 

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Yes, brake fluid has compressibility and it is indeed a factor. Silcone brake fluid is more compressible, and so there have been complaints when it is used about the pedal action being soft due to that. I put silicone bark fluid in my Ascona last fall, but purposely put in stainless braided lines so as to not have the rubber lines AND the more compressible silicone fluid at the same time.

With a larger ID line, yes, the pressure on the line wall is lower, but the volume of the fluid is more, so there is more volume change due to fluid compression. I just brought that up as someone mentioned a long line used for a clutch that sounds like it did not work, but if an AN-3 or 4 line was used, it might have been too much fluid compression...just a guess....
 

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In a private message, Will I. Finish brought up an interesting question about using LONG flexible stainless braided brake lines to replace his front lines on his already assembled car. I thought that this would make a great topic of conversation, so I'm going to share our conversation in this thread and get input from you guys. Here goes:

Will I. Finish:
<<< After all of the comments regarding new brake lines, which I now realize I should have done that when the car was totally stripped, I am looking at alternatives and wondered what your opinion is of Stainless Steel Braid brake line from the master cylinder to each wheel. Did not see anything on the forum about this but it appears to be available out there as well as how to videos. Thanks for you help.
Best Regards, Carl >>>

Me:
<<< Considering the difficulty of replacing the front brake lines with the car put together, 3 or so foot long braided rubber brake hose sounds like a great idea. They have to pass through the radiator wall and an approximately 1/2" diameter hole at each wheel well. It's tough to bend the hard metal brake lines to pass through those wheel well holes without touching/rubbing against them. Rubber grommets are used to prevent the metal from cutting into the lines. Flexible rubber hose with protective stainless braiding sounds like a great solution for this whole situation. The only issues I see are whether the end of the hose that goes to the brake will pass through the wheel well holes and getting flexible braided hoses that have compatible ends for our master cylinders and brakes. The hole in the wheel well could easily be made bigger and adapters may take care of getting the ends to connect. This would be a great subject for a thread, so I'm going to start one on your behalf and quote both of us. :) >>>
Just wanted to say "thanks" to the Sci Fi Guy for bringing up the subject of Braided Stainless Steel brake lines. I was looking at this as an option when I realized it would be next to or just impossible to install standard lines after the car was all put back together and it has been for around 20 odd years. I had my chance 20 odd years ago when I stripped the car but at that time it just did not occur to me - kind of like all of the things you think of after that new house is built. Oh well. I was able to remove the brake line to the junction of the two back wheels and take off a few inches, at the master cylinder, and add a new nut and flair and stop a leak. That was a first for me and nothing is ever as simple as you think it is going to be. Anyway at this point I believe my leak/leaks are behind me so I will not be pursuing the braided brake lines, very expensive as well.
This sudden burst of projects this year is due in a large part to the fact that I am getting the GT ready/extra safe for my daughter who I plan to give the GT to sometime in the not too distant future. She really wants it and I want her to have it, however I don't want her to have issues to deal with, at least for a long time. So I have been taking on those things within my power to take on - so far the only time I have taken it to a machanic was to have the alignment set and I am not a Mechanic, just a parts changer that is highly motivated. So pretty much trying/making sure that most everything is new and everything works and works right. But with that said she is a," do it yourself kind of girl ", - I showed her how to replace the brakes on her Honda Civic when she was around 17, that was 17 years ago, and to this day she does her own brakes so she will not be totally reliant on a mechanic when issues come up. She will be looking to all of you for your wisdom and experience and answers and I would like to thank you all in advance for your help and assistance. This forum, well you all have saved me many times. There are so many little things that could derail a project but pretty much everything is covered in such a way that gives me a fighting chance to succeed.
Last Major Project is to fill the space under the hood - see picture - My new Aluminum Radiator from OGTS is due to arrive next Friday. Hopefully it just slips right in. Can't wait......Thanks again......Best Regards, Carl
Waiting for that New GT Aluminum Radiator.jpg
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That's awesome Carl and what a fortunate daughter you have :) That new radiator will slip right in with no issues and you will love it or should I say. she will love it. I know because I have one :)
 
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