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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The next issue that I now need to address is replacing the worn out distibutor on the 1.9.
My current distributor has the double advance mechanism and is got a lot of slop and wear on the center spindle. I searched the forums and counldn't find a diffinitive process for removing my old one and replacing with a newer single advanced distributor. Any help out there?
P.S. anyone got a newer distributor for sale? :cool:
 

· OPEL-LESS!!!
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Tom:

pulling the dizzy is easy. you can just pop the cap off, still hooked to all wires, unplug the vacuum lines, and dizzy hold down. the one thing that got me my first time was the fuel pump MUST be removed. the dizzy just pulls up and out after that, re-installing is the same but you cannot turn the motor over at all! you'll have alot of fun getting the dizzy to engage with the crank and oil pump at the same time if the motor is turned over.
 

· Opel Tinkerer and Rescuer
1996 Opel Calibra
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7,943 Posts
I got a nice used distributor from a 73' Manta. A little greasy, but good tight bearings, etc.. Even has a set of Blue Streak installed with condensor.

Just replaced it with a distributor I got off a 74' (that had a Pertronix already installed on it).

Make an offer..

Charles
 

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Before you go swapping years keep the advance in mind.

This might help, Thanks Bob in advance

Bob's list below
1968 - 32-36.5 mechanical advance
19.5-22.5 vacuum advance
51.5-59 degrees total

1969 - 32-36 mechanical advance
11.5-14.5 vacuum
43.5-50.5 degrees total

1970 - 32-36 mechanical advance
11.5-14.5 vacuum
43.5-50.5 degrees total

1971 - 28-32 mechanical advance
7-10 vacuum
35-42 degrees total

1972 - 28-32 mechanical advance
7-10 vacuum
35-42 degrees total

1973 - 28-32 mechanical advance
1-5 vacuum
29-37 degrees total

1974 - 28-32 mechanical advance
1-3 vacuum
29-35 degrees total

1975 - 25 mechanical advance
5 degrees static timing
No vacuum advance unit
30 degrees total
 

· Opel Tinkerer and Rescuer
1996 Opel Calibra
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7,943 Posts
Hmm I wonder if these numbers correlate with the number on the arm of the vacuum can? The numbers were different on the two I have. I am curious which ones I have.

Bob, you have any preference?
 

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GoinManta said:
Hmm I wonder is these numbers correlate with the nuber on the arm of the vacuum can? The numbers were different on the two I have. I am curious which ones I have.

Bob, you have any preference?
The year of the distributor is on the distributor body itself.

My preference? I like the '71-'74 these days...I used to like the older ones, but found a better way to modify the late ones. The vacuum cannister doesn't make a difference to me however, as I never use vacuum advance anyway due to my typical cam choices.....

The '71-'74 distributors are the same except for the vacuum advance. Automatic versions have slightly lighter springs to aid initial acceleration (it doesn't work!).

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
See if I got it right??

I have a 69 Kadette double advance dist.
Charles has a 73 Manta dist single advace ( price to be negotiated later)
Smurf states all I have to do is pop the old one out and since the fuel pump is asti- good -by-by ( gone away) all I have to do is pop the new one in.
I think that I note the postion of the old one- which cylinder it is pointing at and make sure the new one is pointing at the same spot
Remove one vacuum line fron the ported intake on the manifold - pluging the intake hole.
Attach the vacuum line to the single advance orifice and connect to the carb
Replace the dist cover- set timing and drive away.
Correct???? Did I miss anything?? :cool:
 

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The 69 should be a solid lifter high compression motor. If it's stock, don't throw away the added advance. If it's not stock I agree with Bob.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
nobody said:
The 69 should be a solid lifter high compression motor. If it's stock, don't throw away the added advance. If it's not stock I agree with Bob.
Solid lifter-yes
High compression- don't know
Stock- yes
Rationale for not changing it ?????????? Tell me-please :cool:
 

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If stock it was designed for the 43 to 50 degrees of advance in 69 and will have hesitation or starting problems with the 29 to 37 from a later model. You would be throwing away power.
 

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We are running into the same problems. We have a 69 high compression engine designed with more advance. Put in 75 distributor No power in the car . We understand that we need to time the car with a timing light where we can set the advance to be about 36 degrees more and that will take care of the problem. Just bought the timing light and have yet to do the timing. And still to dang snowy to test it anyway.

Vickie & Allen
 

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Timing

saxybiker said:
We are running into the same problems. We have a 69 high compression engine designed with more advance. Put in 75 distributor No power in the car . We understand that we need to time the car with a timing light where we can set the advance to be about 36 degrees more and that will take care of the problem. Just bought the timing light and have yet to do the timing. And still to dang snowy to test it anyway.

Vickie & Allen
'75 distributor should be put in with initial 10 deg BTDC static timing . . . 10 + ~25 = 35 total. No matter what the state of the engine, new or well-used, "timing" is a "starting point" only and shouldn't be considered "set ONCE and forget"!

Once initial timing is set, you can sneak up on actual timing engine requires during T&E road testing by adjusting until "ping" and backing off slightly from there. This method also takes into account the various tolerance stackups and individual engine peculiarities, timing chain stretch, piston ring seal, valve lash, etc.

That said, to get the most out of your engine over time, "timing" should be revisited now and again in any case!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
nobody said:
If you use a degree wheel, you can tell where your timing is or how much mechanical advance you have on the distributor. The search function is a good thing.

http://www.tavia.com/free_degree_wheel.html

Size it to match the distributor or front pulley and then you'll know.
Thanks-downloaded my free gift and will print it out today. But once it is printed. what do I do with it? I know I have to measure the angle of something in the distributor but what? Remember- your dealing with a real idiot here. I am a visual learner who until 2 years ago thought a point was the end of a pencil :cool:
 

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Disti vacuum canisters

baronbors said:
I have a 69 Kadette double advance dist.
Charles has a 73 Manta dist single advance ( price to be negotiated later)
Smurf states all I have to do is pop the old one out and since the fuel pump is asti- good -by-by ( gone away) all I have to do is pop the new one in.
I think that I note the postion of the old one- which cylinder it is pointing at and make sure the new one is pointing at the same spot
Remove one vacuum line fron the ported intake on the manifold - pluging the intake hole.
Attach the vacuum line to the single advance orifice and connect to the carb
Replace the dist cover- set timing and drive away.
Correct???? Did I miss anything?? :cool:
Later, up-to-'74 distributors all had single vacuum CANISTER, but with nipples on both sides for vacuum retard/advance just like the '69 did with dual canisters. Large one pointing up and connected to carb throttle port nipple is for "vacuum advance", small one at forward end pointing at distributor body and connected to manifold vacuum by restricted orifice fitting is for "vacuum retard".
 

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The ball and pointer on the flywheel and block are for static timing and not the easiest to see even then. Try doing a search for timing marks and you should find more than enough info.

As for the distributor I use that wheel to determine what the true mechanical advance is. I print a small one the size of the cap and cut a hole in it to put on the distributor shaft. By simply twisting the shaft you can determine how many degrees it has. You can also use a dial back type timing light to do the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
OK- measured the amount of advanced angle and I definetly have a double advanced 69 distributor
1969 - 32-36 mechanical advance
11.5-14.5 vacuum
43.5-50.5 degrees total
The inside of the distributor is gunky and needs to be cleaned but if I do that then I have to replace the lub on the shaft for the points- right? This might be part of the problem. but here is the real problem that I have with the dist.
When I disconnect and plug the vacuum line from the manifold nothing happens- this is a good thing- right? But when I disconnect and plug the advance line from the carburator, the engine dies and will not restart- not good- right? Figure it has to be something in the distributor. Both vacuum canisters seem to be working OK because when I suck on the vacuum lines ( BTW- tastes disgusting) both advance and retard side move full lenght. I was hoping that by changing distributor to a single canister would remedy the problem and get rid of one less advance line :cool:
 

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On a 69 when you remove the retard line it has to be retimed to start. PM me an address and I'll send some of the bosch lube in a baggie.
 

· Pathologic Opeler
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68 distributor

Will this fit my late 70?
its on ebay, and I think i could use a replacement.

what mods would I need to do?

Can't I just plug the retard line ..and then won't it be like a single canister?

Then time it with a light?
 

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