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That's another good point, Bob. We found a cart at the dog shows that had 4 pneumatic tires on it, little itty bitty ones. They are 50 X 200 mm (wheel diameter right at 4" overall diameter 7.5") with a 35 psi max pressure rating. I think the cart is rated to 300 lbs., but it sure is easy rolling from parking lots to show rings across the grass and dirt. Maybe an eight inch wheel would work by keeping the CG down low. The only thing is, to make it work like casters would be a trick. Just a thought.
 

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Both good thoughts RallyBob, Ron. I was wondering about doubling the tires, but may have to rethink my idea of pneumatic tires. Darn sure don't want dump it on the gravel, that would be a bad day indeed. Jarrell
 

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Jarrell, doubling the wheels per axle would increase the payload per axle, maybe more than double, I don't know the equation on that. Also it would be a lot easier to make the smaller tires pivot on a common axle, plus give it a bigger footprint for stability. Figuring with Keith's dimensions, tip over would probably not be a problem, unless the lift would also be a rotisserie. Another thought, how about wheelbarrow tires? They're fairly small and can handle a fair amount of weight.
 

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$250 is all? Gotta be more than that, I shudder at the cost of steel these days and a bottle of welding gas is $90. My cost on those tongue jacks is $35 each.
Some of the bigger boats whose trailers have the heavier jacks use a plastic wheel about 8" in diameter. You can't manhandle these boats around because they are too heavy and the trailer has tandem axles so the wheel on the jack is kind of useless. But in your application the dolly would roll around easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
jeff denton said:
$250 is all? Gotta be more than that, I shudder at the cost of steel these days and a bottle of welding gas is $90. My cost on those tongue jacks is $35 each.
Some of the bigger boats whose trailers have the heavier jacks use a plastic wheel about 8" in diameter. You can't manhandle these boats around because they are too heavy and the trailer has tandem axles so the wheel on the jack is kind of useless. But in your application the dolly would roll around easier.
Hmm, lets see, maybe I was being a bit "optimistic"...
For conversion to $USD, multiply the $CAD by about 0.85 (the Looney is up this week!)
8 pieces of steel were $26.99 each (they were still the "catalogue" price, in spite of the rise in steel prices)
All the bolts, nuts and washers cost about $30
Each jack was actually $29.99 (regular $49.99 at PA, a GREAT sale, and the reason I bought them was they were almost the same price as a regular swivel caster but had the jacking feature, and they are actually rated at 550 lbs each)
A roll of 0.035" flux core MIG wire, which was on sale at PA for $30 (but I actually didn't use a full roll, but probably half, so make that $15). I didn't use my gas welder, but I guess it cost a bit of electricity for the MIG welder and cut-off saw.

So that would make it $380 CAD, or about $315 USD. More than I thought, but still a pretty good deal.

As for pneumatic tires, I don't see why they wouldn't work. You wouldn't need big ones; PA sells a 10" lift pneumatic caster jack with a 10" tire rated at 500 lbs for $63 CAD (a bit too expensive for my blood, but maybe on sale?). Or if you don't want the lift feature, a 4 1/2" (12" tall) pneumatic tired swivel caster for $55 CAD each, but they only have a load rating of 350 lbs. OK for a bare body, but not enough for a fully loaded (engine and tranny) car. Pneumatic tire/wheels are also available: a 5.30/4.5-6 (14" tall) with a 3/4" centre hole rated at 560 lbs is $44.99 CAD.

There are LOTS of choices, only limited by your imagination, and your pocketbook.

HTH
 

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don't forget to make some deep skirt mud guards if you use pneumatic tyres so you can weld on the stand and not have splatter burn through the top of the tyre
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
jtodd said:
How do you get the body on and off of the dolly?
In my case, the car was up on tall jack stands, high enough to remove the engine from below, with the suspension removed. So another design criteria was to be able to get the car from the jack stands to the dolly without a bunch of hysterics. I simply slip the side rails on by inserting the threaded rods into the jack points, and install the backing nuts behind the jack points. Then I bolt the cross rails on to hold the side rails together. Lower the wheels to lift the body (they only have a couple inches higher lift than my tall jack stands), and pull the jack stands away. The "trick" was to have the side rails attach so they didn't go more than an inch under the outer edge of the jack point, so the car could still be on the jack stands and the dolly at the same time.

Because the dolly's lowered height is a bit higher than the car when sitting on its wheels, the car has to be lifted about 12 inches (either jack stands or floor jacks) before the dolly is attached. Or, a different size of caster jack could be used, or they could be mounted lower, to allow the dolly to be installed when the car is sitting on the wheels. But then the car couldn't be lifted high enough to drop the engine out, unless a longer, higher lift jack was used.

HTH
 

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All of those (yours included) have great appeal. The foldup stand is a great idea and I really like the rotissory one. Both would be good to have in a shop. Thanks for the picks!
 

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Other types of Rotisserie

I have been thinking about this subject for a while and found the following web sites and articles.

From what I have found out you can purchase a rotisserie between $750 to $1200 based on various options (wheels, lifts, powder coat).

Here are the web sites

http://www.ponypics.com/spitfire/rotisserie.html

http://www.ado13.com/flip/flipper.html

http://members.aol.com/MOWOGMAN/JRH3.html

http://www.carotator.com/

http://www.prostreetcar.com/body_rotisserie.html

This is the best one I have found

http://www.harwoodperformance.bizland.com/1941buick/Editorial_20.htm

Attached is an artical I found. It explains how to build one.

The question I have is what is the best whay to go? I do not own a welder so I can not do any welding. I like the idea of using 2 engine stands. I though you folks would like to see this other ideas.
 

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Rick;
You don't have to weld, you can use bolts and do the same thing, but, you're right about using the 2 engine stands. I have one from Harbour Freight, excellent buy for the money!!!
 

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BQS4 said:
, but, you're right about using the 2 engine stands. I have one from Harbour Freight, excellent buy for the money!!!
Except most engine stands are welded with an upward tilt to compensate for heavy engines. So the rotating axis of each stand will not be parallel with each other. I made my own for this very reason. You could however cut and reweld the inexpensive engine stands.

Bob
 

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The first thing to consider here is, what are you gonna put on it? Just a bare shell, or the shell plus how much of the rest of the car?
Notice the nicest one, the Harwood, was for rotating a 41 Buick. Would be way overkill for the GT. Overkill is good, though!
The first one, with Spitfire, scared me in that the engine stand wheels aren't far enough apart, looks like it would tip over easily. Notice another was just like it only they spread the wheels out farther. That's better.
The plywood rollover jig is about hilarious. But, what the heck, it works!
Surely you all think my bungee cord from ceiling hooks is silly, but, I like it better than anything we saw here, to be honest with you.
Any of these rotisseries will require a bit of fabricating, as you must get the GT mounted to the pipe that slips into the engine stand. It will be pretty minor, but have it done by a good welder. We don't need any more stories about the car falling over on somebody, or, should I say falling onto nobody...
All the engine stands shown were, or started out as, the el cheapo basic one just like mine. I don't think mine has the tilt Bob mentions, but I think if it did the tubing could be easily tweaked a bit after the load was put on it. Mine was fifteen dollars at my neighbor's estate auction. Rummage sales and flea markets would have them too if you wanna really scrounge. They are seen at Checker sometimes on sale for $45, too.
 

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BQS4 said:
Rick;
You don't have to weld, you can use bolts and do the same thing, but, you're right about using the 2 engine stands. I have one from Harbour Freight, excellent buy for the money!!!
OK,
All you enginener types (Or going to be), here is your challange.

How would plan on building a rotisserie for a GT that would only require being bolted together.

It should be able to rotate 360 and be able to use raise and lower (with jacks like that shown on the one from Flashback). I did some pricing on the jacks at Northern Hardware and that is not that bad of a price.

What is needed is type of steel, lenths, were the holes need to be drilled, and bolts types.

If you can come up with a good plan I will pick up the parts and try to build it.

I am bean counter not an enginner, but I can tell if something will or will not work (I lived with an enginner for 20+ years, my dad).

P.S. Mods If you think this should start a new thread I have no trouble with that. I was just trying to make your job easer by putting this with the same thoughs.
 

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I am closing in on the "copying" of the dolly that Keith designed and hope to have some pictures by the first of the week. I gotta say it is one heck of a sweet design. I can also use it on my Saab SPG by changing the jack points. The Saab engine has to come out the bottom as well. Kudos Keith. There was a lot of thought and work put into this design. :biggthump
Jarrell
 

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After seeing Keith’s Dolly, I knew I had to make one. I used the measurements he provided and the list of materials and proceeded to work on it. The first picture is of the side rails welded. The second picture is of the side rails and angle iron cut. The third picture is the side rails with the jacks, The fourth is from a different angle. This is where I made the first mistake and didn’t know it. I had predrilled the holes for the jacks and it wasn’t until I got the whole thing under the car that I realized I had to have the top 2 holes for the jacks in the top rail, so I had to pull it out and rework it.
 

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The first picture is of the cross rails. The second picture is of the cross rails test fitted to the side rail before the angle iron was welded to them. The third picture is the cross rails welded and the frame bolted together. The fourth picture is of the frame and jacks slid under the car. I found my second mistake about 5 mins later. I used the same tubing thoughout, and this threw the measurements off. I am going to make 8 ½ in spacers out of pipe to spread the cross braces out to give a little more play at the jack points.
 

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The first picture is where I had reworked the mounting holes. The second is from another angle. The third picture is of the frame raised to the car. I failed to take pictures of the jack point mounts to the frame.
 

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