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Discussion Starter #1
Roughly how much would it cost to put a steinmetz kit on an opel gt? Also, How does an Opel drive? Are they quick? Can they handle turns? What is normally their worst problem? Im a college student never drove an opel gt...but im thinking about buying one...so any info I should know about Opels? Thanks
 

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Well, being in a similar boat to you until 2 days ago when my first GT got here, let me say as far as speed goes: do NOT expect a stock GT to drive/accelerate like a modern sports car or a similar vintage vette. It certainly will not lay down like a similar vintage american heavy metal car (camero, charger, etc etc). They have pretty low hp (from what I've been told expect most to run around 65-70 ish). They *are* light so that helps, but you are not gonna win any street races without serious modification. Thats just my two cents worth. :)
 

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Just remember that these cars are 30+ years old. If you can find one already restored(engine, suspension, etc..)they drive like a dream and handle like a new car, but even with a total restored Opel they ALWAYS need a little TLC......

As far as the body kit, mine cost me around $1000 and I put it on myself. I dont know what a body shop would have charged me.
Look at Stanley's 69 Restoration in the Photo Gallery.



Stanley
 

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Fabio-

A good stock Opel GT will accelerate at the same rate as a Ford Taurus. Period road tests indicated a quarter-mile time of 17.7 seconds - don't recall the trap speed off the top of my head. 0-60 times are in the 11 second range for manual, 13+ seconds for an automatic. If you're used to driving a Chevy Cavalier, a GT will feel pretty sparky; if you drive a Lexus as your primary car (nod to kristi here) the GT will feel kinda slow.

The real appeal of a GT (besides *the look*) is the handling. A stocker GT will hang with the best of the pocket rockets inna turn. The car has what is called a front mid engine configuration, as the engine is behind the front wheel centerline and protrudes into the interior compartment. Add in a solidly located rear wheel drive axle, and the road 'feel' is second to none, in my opinion.

Just drove Maggie the Opel to work today; decided to try out Emily's tune-up (my 11-year-old daughter) on the freeway...

Amazing.

Keep in mind Opels were designed to stay planted and running on German Autobahns - the result is a 30 year old car that feels as good as a modern car at speed. Maggie the Opel was completely nonplussed at 85 MPH - got all sorts of neato looks as she whizzed by traffic going 10-15 MPH slower. If I were to upgrade her wheels and tires, there are few performance vehicles that could hang with her in turns.

Proof of this is found in SCCA IT class racing. 30 years after their debut, Opels are STILL competitive at weekend track events. There are a pair that race here at Waterford Hills, (a GT and a Manta) and they consistently turn some of the lowest lap times - often within a second of the 'Vettes!

The downside of owning an Opel is that they are a 30-year-old car. They WILL require frequent maintenance and tinkering to keep them 'just so'. If you don't like spending a day or two a month working on your car, or if car-related problems tax your patience - an Opel is not for you. If you want to stand out from the crowd and are willing to invest the mechanical effort to do so, then there are few cars that will provide as much bang for the buck!
 
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