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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When setting the static timing, how should one be observing to line up the mark on the flywheel with the pointer? I mean, should I try to have my eye at the same "height" as the flywheel, or should I just look while standing?

I ask because in my Haynes manual, there is a photo which was taken very close to the inspection hole (level with the flywheel) , and in a general manual I have it says that it should be observed while standing... so I am a bit confused...

Thanks!!!
 

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boomerang opeler
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i found the best way when the engine is in the car was to use a mirror and a good torch and stand at the side with the mirror at the front under the thermostate housing , point the light at the mirror and use the mirror to change the direction of the light so that it goes back under the exhaust to the hole then with my 3rd hand turn the engine :D
best done in low light or just dark
if the engine is out of the car just look fronm the front by the exhaust with a torch
 

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View timing mark.

Hi there!

Baz is right, you need to be an eagle-eyed contortionist to see that timing mark and turn the distributor at the same time. Does your Manta B not have the timing mark on the timing cover at the front of the engine?

If you're looking at the timing mark thorough the manifold, it's difficult. One help would be to crank the engine with the plugs out and watch the mark. When it comes up, mark it with white paint or chalk. This will aid in seeing the when the engine is running at speed for adjustment.

Best of luck.
 

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Ok lets say you simply bolted the flywheel on exactly the same way you took it off another motor? Would that be okay? Or have I screwed up? I did make sure the holes were in the exact same position.
 

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You're okay.

The flywheel only fits on in one position I believe. It's indexed and should be fine. Check it out by timing it according to the manual. If the distributor goes in and lines up correctly, you're good to go.

Good luck on that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, my car is an Ascona, and I have good clearance to see the mark if I put my head at the height of the air-filter housing. So I guess looking at an angle from above should be fine, and there should be no estimation "if I were looking straight forward it would be there..."

I have made a paint-mark on the front pulley, since there is the mark on the timing cover, I just wanted to know if there is any "better/proper way" to aling the flywheel's ball to the mark (thinking that I may was observing wrong, I might have gotten the mark on the pulley a bit off...). I am a bit of a perfectionist, that's not always good, as I make things dramatically complex...

As for the flywheel bolts, in my Haynes manual says that that you should use the bolt marked with a "P" in the hole marked also with a "P", and it also says that on a new flywheel one of the six holes is a bit narrower, and this is the one that goes to the "P" marks...
To be honest I can' think why this would only be visible with a new flywheel, as there is no bolt that you have to thread-through. So the hole will be a bit narrower afterwards as well. This is just a guess though, please correct me if I am wrong...
 

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Opeler
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gr_diver said:
As for the flywheel bolts, in my Haynes manual says that that you should use the bolt marked with a "P" in the hole marked also with a "P", and it also says that on a new flywheel one of the six holes is a bit narrower, and this is the one that goes to the "P" marks...
To be honest I can' think why this would only be visible with a new flywheel, as there is no bolt that you have to thread-through. So the hole will be a bit narrower afterwards as well. This is just a guess though, please correct me if I am wrong...
Quote from "Bob" classicopels.com, approx. 2001:
I've measured the flywheel mark to be off by as much as 7.5 degree. However, 3 to 4 degrees is more common. The reasons? Flywheel manufacturing tolerances are one (remember, just .002" off at the flywheel bolts is a huge amount at the outside diameter of the flywheel), the others are float or slop in the flywheel bolts relative to the holes in the flywheel. The most common is not using the correct flywheel bolts. There are 5 that are fully threaded shank, and one (the locator) which has a partially threaded shank to precisely align the flywheel. Either way, I always have measured the pointer to be off by a few degrees, based on measuring the #1 piston at TDC with a dial indicator. This is the only accurate method. At this point, I always mark the front pulley, and from that point on ignore the flywheel altogether.
 
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