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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
How about a road kit. Things you might need, after you drive away from your trove of shop tools.
A roll of duct tape, WD40, a Leatherman, a tire inflator with slime to fix a flat, a flash light, and a hot girlfriend.



If the duct tape, WD40, Leatherman, and tire inflator can't solve the problem... have the hot girlfriend flag down a stranger and catch a ride back home.

Now guess which part of the road kit is the most expensive part. :LOL:
 

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Can Opeler
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Also I would invest in some good milwaukee vice grips I have some and they are amazing!
I must agree. Very well designed vice grips. You can use a screwdriver to tighten the heck out of them and they are designed to be used with a wrench at multiple angles for extra torque
 
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The Young One
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I must agree. Very well designed vice grips. You can use a screwdriver to tighten the heck out of them and they are designed to be used with a wrench at multiple angles for extra torque
I like using the vice grips for really rust bolts and nuts.
 

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Über Genius
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Young people love vice grips. They're a step up from pliers.
Experienced people rarely use vice grips because they know there's a better tool for each application. They also know how much damage vice grips cause.
 
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Can Opeler
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Young people love vice grips. They're a step up from pliers.
Experienced people rarely use vice grips because they know there's a better tool for each application. They also know how much damage vice grips cause.
Lol that’s a nice blanket statement there that is quite false in my experience.

Vice grips are the difference to spending hours removing stripped torque tube bolts or spending 30 seconds. I can’t say I’ve seen a “young person” use vice grips on anything except a already destroyed part. The point of them is to cause damage.
 
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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I can only think of using vice grips when something is already ruined. Stripped, cross threaded, or rusty bolts, broken nails, etc... already ruined which is why other tools won't work. I wouldn't want to use vice grips on something that isn't ruined already.
 

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The Young One
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I use them on something that is so rusty you just need a new part like a bolt or nut. I do know that they destroy things so I don't try to use them too much. I use them on my super destroyed 1975 Kawasaki kz400.
 

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Über Genius
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Lol that’s a nice blanket statement there that is quite false in my experience.

Vice grips are the difference to spending hours removing stripped torque tube bolts or spending 30 seconds. I can’t say I’ve seen a “young person” use vice grips on anything except a already destroyed part. The point of them is to cause damage.
I like it when younger guys tell older guys they don't know what they're talking about. ;)
 
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Detritus Maximus
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I use them on something that is so rusty you just need a new part like a bolt or nut. I do know that they destroy things so I don't try to use them too much. I use them on my super destroyed 1975 Kawasaki kz400.
That KZ is a good first project for you! parts are cheap and small enough to work on. You don't have to do a restoration, but they look great as stripped down cafe racers. Small enough to be a good learners bike.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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A roll of duct tape, WD40, a Leatherman, a tire inflator with slime to fix a flat, a flash light, and a hot girlfriend.



If the duct tape, WD40, Leatherman, and tire inflator can't solve the problem... have the hot girlfriend flag down a stranger and catch a ride back home.

Now guess which part of the road kit is the most expensive part. :LOL:
Obviously the girlfriend, but I don't think the stranger knows what it's going to cost him!
 
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The Young One
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That KZ is a good first project for you! parts are cheap and small enough to work on. You don't have to do a restoration, but they look great as stripped down cafe racers. Small enough to be a good learners bike.
I don't know what I am going to do with it since it is so rusty. I got the engine to turn over(if you saw my other videos about it) but I don't know if it will ever run or drive again. I was going to spend money on it because parts are cheap,but I decided to save my money on the Opel Gt I am hoping to buy this spring. I did really want to turn it into a cafe racer, butthat probably won't happen. Also you should subscribe to my channel.
 

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Über Genius
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So, originally I assumed this thread seemed like the $100 tool box you should always take with you when driving your Opel.
That's where I think some of the answers were coming from.
If you're carrying vice grips with you on a drive, maybe consider these.


Dang those got expensive. A few years ago I bought 6 of them off the Leatherman floor for $29 each.
 
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Put it all into better jackstands perhaps.
+1 on that. Likely won't fit into the $100 budget, though.

US Jack. Expensive, but when you use them, you get the feeling you're as well protected as you can be on that front. Bought a set for me and a set for #1 son. Safety is good. Those won't fit into the $100 budget, for sure...not by a long shot.
 

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Suddenly, not that hypothetical.

My van got stolen a couple weeks ago, with most of my tools it in (because I was junkyarding daily to fix up my 2 daily drivers now that the weather has improved). Vehicle was recovered (punched locks and ignition, still driveable), but tools were all gone. No contents insurance, deductible was too high to be worth it.

Ehn, no big rush, haven't touched my car in over 6 months, but I was lacking even the basics. Wasn't even sure what I should look for first.

Pain in the ass, I don't have an inventory of what was in there, was one of those "toss a few more tools in every morning" kind of jobs, since I only have 30 minutes at the yard before I have to leave for work. All of my sockets and ratchets, my new set of cheap wrenches, a rolling floor jack, my big C-clamps, sawzall, bigger crescent wrenches, all my vice grips, some pliers, some cutters and snips, brushless drill/bat/charger, prybars. I guess I'll find out when I go looking for something and can't find it anywhere, but I'll always wonder if it's just maybe around here somewhere.

Just wanted to say thanks to everyone for contributing to this thread, especially with links. It at least frames the decisions on what to look for first and what my payment ceilings should be for used tools.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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Sorry to hear that. Nothing worse than human parasites.

For some things CPO Tools has been a great source for quality power tools and accessories and some great prices compared to the stores. I've got a decent amount of Milwaukee m12 and m18 cordless stuff, mostly reconditioned, but with virtually no problems...i had one duff battery pack.
 
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Detritus Maximus
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And I'll add an addition to the ToolBox....

So most manuals either leave a lot out or assume you have experience/knowledge already. A few years back, 10...15...it's been a while, I ran across one of these. It's a automotive textbook, high school shop class level maybe. This one is from the 1969 edition. I really wish I had found it when I was just getting started with cars and junk. What makes it so nice is that it talks about all the different tools and how to use them, everything from screwdrivers to measuring tools to making your own brake lines to proper riveting to proper wiring to how all the shop tools work. Even the newer textbooks from the same publisher leave alot of this out as they have to cover all the other technology in new cars. Eleven chapters on just tools and how to use them.
This book makes all the other manuals make sense...especially since it was written for the technology in old cars. Later editions, after 75 start change quite a bit.

Best of all it was $9.00 including shipping on Ebay.

Auto Service and Repair
by Stockel
published by Goodheart and Wilcox
 

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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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Discussion Starter · #39 · (Edited)
This thread is potentially very useful because the best advice is given not as a hypothetical solution but as wisdom gained from hindsight.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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As a wise man once said...
"A smart person learns from their mistakes".
I say..
"A smarter person learns from the mistakes of others".
 
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