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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I have a problem and am wondering if you have seen it before. I have a 1.9L with the usual Weber upgrade. The throttle will not go to full throttle and even stuck on me when I tried to floor it. It looks like the final shaft to the carb is too long and the elbow at the firewall is getting in a bind. I already replaced the bushings. Before I take it all apart AGAIN. I was hoping someone had dealt with this before. The motor mounts are new and I am using a stock intake manifold. FYI, it's a 72 GT.
 

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Depending on the shaft length on the Weber, I have had to either bend the firewall bracket, or even cut down the linkage (the final shaft from the firewall to the carb).

Cutting the linkage shorter is tricky. Sometimes just the stub that sticks thru the bracket towards the firewall can simply be trimmed a bit shorter.

My Weber DPS100 (a 38DGAS without the auto-choke, since converted to an electric choke) has a VERY long input shaft. I had to cut almost 1/2 inch out of the middle of the linkage shaft, flattened the ends, and fabricated a collar w/ four set screws so it was adjustable and yet reliable.
 

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· Can Opeler
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There are two adjustments on the linkage. One below behind the engine on the drivers side.

There is also an adjustment point where the throttle comes through the firewall in the engine bay.
There is a clip that you take off and then you can remove the linkage connection and adjust the turnbuckle on the threaded rod.

The above paragraph makes zero sense until you look at it in the engine bay though.
 
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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Hey guys. I have a problem and am wondering if you have seen it before. I have a 1.9L with the usual Weber upgrade. The throttle will not go to full throttle and even stuck on me when I tried to floor it. It looks like the final shaft to the carb is too long and the elbow at the firewall is getting in a bind. I already replaced the bushings. Before I take it all apart AGAIN. I was hoping someone had dealt with this before. The motor mounts are new and I am using a stock intake manifold. FYI, it's a 72 GT.
I have had this problem, with a 1970 GT and a Weber 32-36. I could not get the throttle rod to attach to the little ball at the carb. All of a sudden the rod seemed too long. So here are some things that I did. I cut the rubber bushing down on the front of the fire wall bracket which gave me close to 1/8 inch which allowed the throttle rod to move back away from the fire wall about and 8th of an inch. Also look at the way you reassembled all of the parts forwarded of the little ball toward the carb - anything in there out of place or anything in there that you don't need. Also did you just replace the bushing or did your new bushing come with a new bracket that attaches to the fire wall - that new bracket may be an issue. I tried the new bracket and new red bushing and went back to the rubber bushing and old bracket. The rubber bushing was easy to cut down. I also found that when trying to put it together, that is attaching the rod to the little round ball that it was easier if the throttle was in the full open position. The fact that the throttle stuck open sounds like you have the linkage tigtened down too much at the carb connection - there must be a little play there or that can happen as it did with me. Hard to give up that little bit of space if you are too tight in the back at the fire wall bracket.
 

· Can Opeler
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You can also grind down the nut with the ball on it on the carburetor to get you 1/8” back. I’ve had to do this before too
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have had this problem, with a 1970 GT and a Weber 32-36. I could not get the throttle rod to attach to the little ball at the carb. All of a sudden the rod seemed too long. So here are some things that I did. I cut the rubber bushing down on the front of the fire wall bracket which gave me close to 1/8 inch which allowed the throttle rod to move back away from the fire wall about and 8th of an inch. Also look at the way you reassembled all of the parts forwarded of the little ball toward the carb - anything in there out of place or anything in there that you don't need. Also did you just replace the bushing or did your new bushing come with a new bracket that attaches to the fire wall - that new bracket may be an issue. I tried the new bracket and new red bushing and went back to the rubber bushing and old bracket. The rubber bushing was easy to cut down. I also found that when trying to put it together, that is attaching the rod to the little round ball that it was easier if the throttle was in the full open position. The fact that the throttle stuck open sounds like you have the linkage tigtened down too much at the carb connection - there must be a little play there or that can happen as it did with me. Hard to give up that little bit of space if you are too tight in the back at the fire wall bracket.
I replaced the rubber with a new red bushing in the original bracket. I may have the ball too tight, I will check. It does seem like the final rod is just too long and is rubbing badly on the red bushing. The linkage is also rubbing on the firewall insulation. I will just go ahead and pull the carb and go through the whole thing again. Thanks!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Depending on the shaft length on the Weber, I have had to either bend the firewall bracket, or even cut down the linkage (the final shaft from the firewall to the carb).

Cutting the linkage shorter is tricky. Sometimes just the stub that sticks thru the bracket towards the firewall can simply be trimmed a bit shorter.

My Weber DPS100 (a 38DGAS without the auto-choke, since converted to an electric choke) has a VERY long input shaft. I had to cut almost 1/2 inch out of the middle of the linkage shaft, flattened the ends, and fabricated a collar w/ four set screws so it was adjustable and yet reliable.
That may need to be done. That is a good way of shortening the shaft. Thanks.
 
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