Opel GT Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
OK this will be sort of long, but if you want to hear that original clock run once again read on. This is the most common problem with a non running clock. First get it out of the dash remember which wire is hot and ground. Hot should be the one with the rubber boot on it. Once it is out turn it over, white cover up to find the three 5mm nuts, one will have a plastic cup around it, break it off. Take all three nuts off, and pull the cover off (be careful not to break it). There are three more 5mm nuts just under where the other three for the cover were. take them off. Pull off the electrical component and turn it to find the copper wraped coil. Look under the coil to find the brass power supply to the coil. It should connect to a metal tab on the far side with a hole in it. If it's corroded that's your problem. Clean the metal and brass pieces where they connect, and solder them back with each other. Clean the contact points on the arm and disk, (looks like a set of points out of a distributor). Put it back together, making sure the arm on the disk is on the teeth of the gear. Should work now. Don't worry about springs going every where they should stay in place. :D
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited by Moderator)
12v

If the voltage regulator in you car is struggling, the clock will probably keep bad time, because its' input voltage is varying. There are a couple of fixes:
-Change out the Opel alternator or generator with a GM one.
-Install an individual voltage regulator on just the clock.
Most companies that sell electric gages sell voltage regulators, Radio Shack has an IC one that works great, and I'll list a couple of donor car ones if anyone is interested.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
forgot very important

I almost forgot. Before you reattach the electric compoint back on the clock frame be sure to wind the (L) shaped arm 3 times clock wise, looking down on it with it facing you. This is crucial for the clock to run. You will have to hold this part while you put the electric back to the frame. 3 turns of the arm should keep it pushed to the gear, and let it slide along the gear without binding up. Sorry I forgot this on my original post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
I was playing with my clock a couple of days ago. the area where the positive meets up was detached so I soldered it. Now with power to the mechanism the round piece flops back and forth (startled me at first). When I put it back together the electronic portion does not have enough power to run the clock. I can turn it with some effort with my fingernail on the gear, but when it is pushing unassisted it cannot start or keep the clock running. Also, When it gets to the point where it contacts it pushes the round part only about 1/8-1/4 turn rather than about the full half that it appears it could turn.

I sprayed the gears with WD-40 and that made them turn a little easier for me.

Anyone know how to fix this?
 

·
GT Resurrectionist
Joined
·
67 Posts
I was the one who started this thread along time ago, To clean it try lighter fluid or rubbing alcohol. this is because the clocks were made to run dry. WD40 will keep oil on the parts and collect dust which may cause it to seize up.

Since this post I have been able to repair a clock with only taking the cover off and not taking the clock works apart. This consisted of just taking the cover off laying it on it's side and and reconecting the bad conection. (not too easy) It's like trying to play Operation in the dark. If I can ever get the chance I'll post some pics on how to do it.
 

·
GT Resurrectionist
Joined
·
67 Posts
That is weird, there should be 3 more 5 mm nuts under the plastic cover. Did the clock works come apart? If not don't take it apart just yet. Shine a light in it and find the copper wound coil. under this there should be a thin peice of metal that runs to one side and connects to the metal bracket. This will more than likely be disconnected, Try to solder it back togather and it should work.

Second, once I fix the clock, how do I set the time? Jen

There should be a time adjustment that pushes in onto the hands in the front.

Although I have seen only one style of the clocks in the GT, I think they used another style in the later production models. I don't think I have seen the other styles. This may be what you have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
When I take the white cover off there is a clear plastic plate over the copper coil. I don't know how to remove this.

Also I can see the metal underneath the coil and it is not connected, yet I dont see how in the world I could get to it to solder it back.

Last I tried to wind the clock in front, as that seems how most clocks wind, yet it is too tight. Maybe rusted. There is a small spring in there that seems rusted.

Jennifer
 

·
Über Genius
Joined
·
9,046 Posts
Clock repair in 4 easy steps

Today I decided to take the clock apart to see if I could get it to work.
Upon careful inspection I realized that the clock itself was actually fine but the problem was that it wouldn't "run".

Here are the 4 easy steps I did to fix my clock.

1) Carefully remove the white cover by removing the 3 5mm screws and pulling the cover off making sure not to damage the rubber seal.

2) Spray the bejeezes out of the clock with Gumout carb cleaner. (any non residue solvent cleaner should work)

3) Test the clock by hooking it up to a battery charger. (wait till all the solvent is evaporated first)

4) Reassemble by reversing step 1.

Clock works perfectly.

:D
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top