Opel GT Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How does adding a Pertonix unit affect the timing? Right now I am probably somewhere in the 5-10 degree advance range (with points) in order to get most of the little starting, hesitating and smooth running issues resolved (I still have some sort of flat spot in the 2500-3000 range that I can't seem solve). Does the addition of the Pertronix change something like that?

Any comments appreciated.
 

·
70's Opeler, back 4 more!
Joined
·
398 Posts
Adding electronic ignition doesn't affect the timing any more than adding new points. Electronic ignition makes the firing more precise and the maintenance of the points obsolete.

Also, points float and they will eventually deteriorate so that your timing, or dwell will change. EI does away with all of that.

Bucky installed EI in his GT where he thought he had Carb problems and it cleaned up for him.

The only problem with EI is that when it goes, nothing is going the help your engine run. With Points, you can at least limp home.
 

·
Old Opeler
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
Ei, Ei, Oh

With my EI equiped cars I have always put an old points distributor in the back of the car in case the EI dies. Haven't had to do a roadside swap in thirty years so I guess EI is pretty reliable ......
But as an old points guy I cannot completely trust something that I cannot fix on the roadside :rolleyes:
 

·
Opeler
Joined
·
752 Posts
timing after pertronix install

I just put a (used) Pertronix on my Manta. When I went to start it, it wouldn't. Timing was WAY off. After I rotated the distributor about 15-20 degrees CCW it started and I was able to reset the timing. It ran fine before that on the points and the timing was correct.

The instructions (K. Wilford) I found online here said simply that after the install the car should start and then to reset the timing. I set the gap at .030" as the instructions said.

Can someone explain why the timing went so far off when I installed it?

Thanks,
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,733 Posts
Don, something about how the trigger wheel pickup mounted to the plate changed the timing a bit. You can't expect different components to be automatically perfectly timed to the crankshaft. When messing with ignitions I always use a spark tester, hooked to all plug wires, I always set initial timing this way, spark plugs out, get it right before trying to start the engine. It just looks so unprofessional to see an engine being started with backfires through the carb... irks me, they do it every time on American Hot Rod!
Everybody should look at ignitions through an oscilloscope if they get a chance. Shows you very clearly what your spark looks like on a TV screen, it makes the whole series of events more understandable. There is one in every professional auto shop, heck, there's even one in my little backyard shop. Snap On and MAC both made very compact, portable ones that work very well, I'll bet they can be had pretty cheap nowadays (used) now that most cars are computerized... Mine is the Snap On Counselor, it was $750 used when I got it in '88. It is the first thing to hook up when I think there is an ignition problem!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,298 Posts
Perlux . . . early Pertronix

GTJIM said:
With my EI equiped cars I have always put an old points distributor in the back of the car in case the EI dies. Haven't had to do a roadside swap in thirty years so I guess EI is pretty reliable ......
But as an old points guy I cannot completely trust something that I cannot fix on the roadside :rolleyes:
I installed my first EI trigger (Perlux) in my GT as I converted to '75 FI back in '78-'79 . . . haven't touched either one mechanically since! Yes, they're THAT reliable. :eek:

ONLY thing you have to remember is that if you EVER charge your battery in-car for any reason, remove the ground strap/lead from the battery BEFORE you begin the charge. This is just my little personal safety precaution to protect the Pertronix trigger.
 

·
Opeler
Joined
·
752 Posts
Coil temperature

OK, my Pertronix is in the Manta and the car runs fine but I have another question: "how hot should the coil get when operating?"

I've got a stock-style coil which requires external resistance, so I left the original + wire hooked to it and ran a separate wire for the Pertronix. I used an "empty" male terminal I found on the connector from the first (rear) steering column to fuse box connector, which provides power only when the key is in the "on" position. The coil (an Autozone stock part) was new last summer and only has a couple thousand miles at most.

After running the car a while I happened to touch the "can" of the coil and it was pretty hot, uncomfortable to keep my hand on. The top of the coil, wires, and terminals on the coil were much cooler. I did the same with my GT after a run (it still has points) and it was quite a bit cooler.

Now I never touched the Manta coil before to check its temp, so I haven't got a clue if it ran this hot before Pertronix and I don't see how or why the operating temp could be affected by the Pertronix since I wired it the recommended way. What's normal?

So will I make it to Carlisle and back or will my hot coil self-destruct?

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,127 Posts
OK- I am not one to be a RAH- RAH type person but I got my Pertronix in the mail yesterday and put it in last night. Drove it to school this morning . Started right up with no grinding the starter for 10 seconds. After school was over, started right up and took it out on the highway. I am so impressed with the difference, I just regret not doing it sooner. Acceleration has incresed dramatically and the top end is no longer 80-90 mph but I stopped giving it gas at 100mph with still more to go. WOW!! My question is this- I am running the regular internal resistance coil. What will hapeen if I put the Flamethrower coil on and which Flamethrower should I buy and is it worth it to do? :cool:
 

·
Senior Contributor
Joined
·
5,045 Posts
A loooooong time ago, in my 1973 V6 German Ford Capri, I installed a unit to get rid of the points. It worked for quite some time, until the day it quit, while my car being driven very slowly over a set of RAILROAD TRACKS! :eek: . After cranking the motor for about 5 seconds, I yelled to my B'inlaw to get the hell out and push. Five minutes later a train went by. So don't tell me they don't ever fail :rolleyes: . Of course I was working with electronics that were from somewhere around 1975.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
583 Posts
Which coil?

There are a myraid of choices in the coil department. Otto is right up the road and he's an authority on coils. According to Otto, that stock Bosch coil with the tan top is perfect for a stock high compression or low compression engine with a Weber. I've run the stock internal resistance coil on a low-compression Manta with the Pertronix, MSD-5 box and fuel injection. Good for 100mph+.

I've also run the Bosch Red Coil with the same setup, no problem and very little difference in performance. Just make sure that Pertronix is getting 12V from a switched source at the fuse panel and you're good to go with the stock setup. Unless you're getting a high RPM miss, that stock coil is good.

If you want to put some money in something, try an MSD-5 or MSD-6A box. Those double the spark up to 3000RPM and 6000RPM, respectively. You'll notice a difference at idle and off the line. The MSD-5 is about $80 or so. The 6A is about $149 I think.

Good luck.

Dave
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top