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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey gang just a quick question can a u-hual tow dolly tow a gt any problems using that type of dolly..........thanks gang!!!!................jman
 

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Get the front up on the ramps, lash the front tires down, and unhook the driveshaft and away you go
 

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I used the u-haul tow trailer for thelast GT I moved, for two reasons.

1. I didn't have to remove the drive shaft

2. the ground affects would have been messed up by the dolly.

What every you do, GET the INSURANCE. I passed on the insurance and, sure as the world, one of the tires decided it like the idea of being just steel belts again, without rubber around it.

When the tire shredded, some of the belts got into the paint on the car and really messed it up. (This was even with the steel fender over the tires.)

U-Haul reimbursed me for the cost of the tires, but, because I didn't have insurance, they would touch the car repairs. I had to turn that into my own insurance.

Just a word about renting and insurance.
 

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I towed a GT with the back wheels on the dolly due to differential problems. Secured the steering wheel and 400 miles later, I got it home, no problems. I agree with the insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
jlthunder what is the best wat to secure the steering wheel thanks..........................jman
 

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Used a uhaul dolly behind a Ranger three weeks ago to tow a GT 100 miles... I put the front wheels on the dolly and the tranny in neutral (stick) and off I went. If the GT were any narrower it wouldn't span the ramps. The v6 Ranger didn't even notice the GT was in tow it was so light. Averaged @65 mph. Didn't get the insurance because it was a parts car... I would if it were a finished GT.

I know on an automatic you need to drop the driveshaft but I have never done it on a manual.

You only need to secure the steering wheel if you tow it with the rear end on the dolly. I have used a flat, nylon webbed tie-down. Wrap it through the steering wheel spokes and around the pedals or around the seat. It is very important that the steering wheel cannot move. At 45+ mpf you don't want the car trying to make a u turn.
 

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I agree with Husker or the pros use a bar which clamps to the steering wheel and then to the brake pedal or floor. Ask your local mechanic if you can borrow his.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
husker


is that safe having the stick in neutral need to go about 300 miles thanks for your input.................jman
 

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I pulled my first GT from So. Cal to KS. on a dolly. Tranny in neutral with 2 rest stops. 1300 miles or so, no prob.
 

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I have heard many times that on short trips the driveshaft on a manual doesn't need to be removed but on long trips it should be. Something about the rear bearing on the trans not being lubricated. I figured for a half hour of work, it was worth the peace of mind when I towed a GT on a tow dolly from Dallas, TX. to NJ. We used a Ford Ranger with a 3.0 v-6 and it pulled it like it wasn't there. We did have road debris fly up and bust the windshield on the Ranger but that wasn't covered under the insurance from U-haul. It did make the last 12 hours of driving interesting. We prayed for no rain and got home safe! 250$ for a new windshield to be put in.
 

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I'll just put in my $.02 again on the insurance.

I didn't buy the insurance when I pulled mine because I'm a guy, and WHAT could possibly happen that I couldn't handle.

I did some research on U-Haul and some of the other rental places before selecting U-Haul, just because of convience. There are a lot of sites on the internet where people are complaining about U-Haul, their service, there equipment, the availablity of that equipment, even after reserving it, and so on. My situation was, I reserved the trailer three weeks in advance. When I went to pick it up, the guy was closed. I found out from people I was working with, who knew him, he was on his fall fishing vacation and wouldn't be back for two weeks. I then had to scramble to find another one. (but enough of this nonsense.)

I found out later that U-Haul does very little if anything to maintain or check or verify the status of their dollys or tow trailers. I also found out that a lot of things are covered if there is equipment failure on U-Haul's part.

If I pulled a parts car, using U-Haul equipment, I would still get the insurance. Who knows, if there's an accident, you might get a better "rare" car than the parts or the one you are restoring.

Best wishes!
 

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towing a GT

greetings. i got my pre-owned 1970 Opel GT this past august (2003). flew to missippi to pick it up. i opted to rent a u-haul truck and tow trailer. then towed the GT to raleigh, nc. had no problems and comfort of mind. glad i didn't opt for the dolly, cause i would've been clueless to the driveshaft.
 

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i pulled my gt from cleveland to kansas city on a car transport trailer from u-haul. i feel this is the way to go. say what you will about u-haul, the trailer pulled great!! with a tow dolly, the car and dolly sort of dance back and forth, all the way home. the trailer stayed right behind the truck, no serving, no excitement, no worries!!

i made this trip in 48 hours. that's 24 hours driving in a 48 hour span (most of it in a snowstorm)...the piece of mind of having the trailer was priceless.
 

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I agree with you, mjewell. A car trailer is the way to go, as longs as you can pull it. If you can pull it then you can tarp the GT, Manta, what ever, and protect the paint from most stuff. Minus rocks and such;) .
 

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i'm with the majortiy here. towed one GT without motor and trans about 2 miles to my house with dolly, big pain in the ass, bouncy, sway back and forth, not to mention difficult to back up. hauled 4 GTs, and tomarrow will be 5th GT, all on trailer. they're easier to back up, you can secure the car down better, you dont have to worry about drivetrain condition, or if your hurting it. the only downfall is that a trailer dont fit in a couple places a car dolly will, but overall trailer is much better.
 

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Yes, I'd say the same. I used to be in the repo business, picking up cars for banks that had been dumped (or hidden) by their owners out of state. Unless your tow vehicle is at least twice the size of the vehicle being towed, dont even consider a tow dolly. Insurance a definite must, either way. A trailer is safer, easier and (ever drag around an empty tow dolly through a quiet neighborhood in the middle of the night??) quieter. Oh, and you haven't lived until you've tried to back a loaded tow dolly into a tight space. Pack a lunch...
 

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I agree that a trailer would be wiser for longer hauls... The GT was only @100 miles from my house and it was a parts car so I thought what the heck. The dolly is noisy (loaded or not) and it does sway a bit, but nothing extreem. I even pulled it through a McDonalds drive through with the added flexibility.

I towed a 69 SuperBee on a uhaul dolly from Abilene, TX to Colorado. just pulled the drive shaft (automatic) and off I went. The need for pulling the drive shaft on an auto is because it turns the tranny... doesn't do it on a manual. Pull the shaft on any auto being pulled over 50 miles or so.

I don't know if putting the manual tranny in neutral is safe but it worked for me.

Good luck
 

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You need to pull the drive shaft on any vehicle that you are dragging the rear axle to tow. What would happen if a tranny slipped into gear at say 40 miles an hour? Doesn't sound pretty to me.
 

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Yep, that, and the odometer just keeps right on turning as long as the wheels are turning. The Opel is just a little bit harder to pull the driveshaft on than most other cars. You just can't get a wrench/hand up inside the tunnel, so you have to rotate the shaft to access the locking clips and the nuts.:mad:

Ron
 

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There is no need to disconnect the drive-shaft if you have a 4-speed. I don't have my Opel Owners Manual handy, but I am quite certain that it specifically states that manual transmission Opels can safely be towed with the rear wheels on the ground. Generally, only automatic transmission-equipped cars are a concern when towing with the drive wheels rotating, as the transmission risks being under-lubricated if it spins without the fluid pump operating. I have towed a number of Opels quite long distances without any damage. The most recent was my '75 Ascona SportWagon, which I towed using our Club's tow dolley from Edmonton to Calgary. That is about 300 km (185 miles) and we towed it at 110 km/h (68 mph) the entire way without damage. As for securing the steering wheel, it depends on what you use to tow it. I have a tow bar for my GT, and you MUST leave the steering wheel unlocked, or it will scrub the front tires when you go around a corner. For a two wheel dolley, most have wheels that "steer" when you turn, so the towed cars wheels (either front or rear) that are sitting on the dolley are just lashed to the frame, and don't turn.

JM2CW
 
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