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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all. Bear with me - I'm new to all this. On my '71 GT, last weekend I changed the points, condensor, cap, rotor, and spark plug wires. Took short drive, before I set the point dwell angle or set the timing. I made a little adjustment to the carb (weber) by raising the idle slightly. It rode rough, sluggish and sputtered a bit when I shut it off, which I figured was because I had not made any timing or dwell angle adjustments yet. Yesterday, I bought my dwell meter and timing light to tune it up, but it wouldn’t start. Its turning over, but the engine won’t start. It did start once or twice for a couple seconds barely, sounded real rough and then shut off. I replaced the ignition coil. I still get the same thing. The one thing I notice is the electric fuel pump is not clicking away as I usually hear it, sending fuel. It usually clicks repeatedly, but now I just hear a couple clicks. Any advice on what I should test first? Could the point dwell angle be so off that the car can’t start? Could this be the ignition switch or solenoid that gives everybody trouble eventually? By the way - sorry for those crappy looking pics I posted the other day. The red '69 has some great mods which I'm sure some people would like to see. I have a much better view of it. If anyone is interested, send me a mssg and I'll email the pic to you.

Thanks in advance for any help!
Kajun GT
 

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I'd check the pump first, unhook it from the carb and stick the open end in a large bottle or container, then turn on the key, if it's working properly, it'll pump fuel into the container, if not, you're not getting gas. That being the case, you need to correct that first.
 

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Before you use the dwell meter, I would set the points first, static, with the rubbing block on the high point of the cam to about .018. Then make sure the static timing and firing order is correct. I hope you replaced the spark plug wires one at a time so you didn't get the firing order wrong.

Ron
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tune Up

Ron:
You're right. I was getting ahead of myself. I removed the cap, looked and I had the point cam follower close to the corner of the shaft so I went ahead with my gauge and gapped it. I turned the key and the car started up better than it ever has! Idling high, though - 1300 or so. I drove it down the street and it was really bad, jerky. I'm thinking I need to continue with the tune up in order - next set the dwell, then set the ignition timing, then adjust the carb. I'd like to set the gap with the points dead on the shaft corner, so I gotta bump the engine to move the
shaft, right? The book says you can move the crankshaft pulley by hand and turn the engine if you remove the spark plugs. Others say use a remote starter. What is the easiest way? Oh yeah - I was real careful about the plug wires.
 

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There is a catch-22 in tuning up all older cars. The idle has to be right on, the timing has to be right on, and the ignition has to be right on. If you adjust carb, timing, or dwell it will change the idle RPM, and ignition timing, so you have to continually go back and forth until you get everything right on, right on. The same goes for adjusting the carb but it is a little less noticeable. You can make adjustments in air/fuel mixture than are barely discernable that can make a fair change in mileage and power. When I have everything done, I think, I go back and double check all the settings one more time, and then tweak it because something has changed since the last adjustment. Either that or as one of my daughters told me, I'm anal about having things as close to perfect as possible. You should be able to turn the engine by hand if you push hard on the fan belt and turn the fan blades, just make sure you turn in the normal direction of engine rotation. If that doesn't work, a quick and dirty way to bump the engine is to use a screwdriver and short it across the battery connection at the solenoid and across the terminal that does not go to the coil. This will energize the solenoid and cause the starter to spin as long as the screwdriver is in contact with both terminals. It will cause a fair spark and put arc pits at all points of contact. Not for the faint hearted.

Ron
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tune up

Ron:
Thanks for the advice. I'm learning and I want to do it the right way. I'm a bit of a perfectionist myself. Thanks again for the tips.

David M.
 

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If you did not tighten the screw on the points enough, the points could have closed up during your test drive. Another tip; recheck the point gap after you tighten the screw.

If the fuel line is filled and pressurized, the fuel pump should pump slower.
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Tune up

Thanks Gary. I got the points set and gapped right. I'm going to continue with the dwell angle adjustment. The car runs rough. When I finally got the engine to start I had to raise the idle on the carb to keep it going. Should it be that rough now in this tune up process? I'm afraid I'm gonna get the carb outta whack, but I keep having to make little adjustments to it.
 

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Hello Kajun GT,

Just a thought, but have you thought about getting a
Pertronix Ignition Kit?? Part # 1847V
- most VW parts stores/ suppliers should be able to sell/order you one. Think I paid around $60 for one.

The kit replaces the points, condenser with an electronic
module that replaces the points assembly.

I have installed one on my GT, & I will never go back to fighting
with the points , condenser, etc. again. Do a search on this site for Pertronix, should find plenty of info.

My 2 cents worth....

Mark
 

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Raising the RPM by the correct screw will not mess up the carb, but you have to be sure you are using the screw at the throttle linkage, not the ones on the carb body. The one at the linkage is the idle stop screw and does the same thing as putting your foot on the gas pedal and pressing down slightly. The air fuel mixture can be adjusted slowly and roughly by using the tach in the car to get the highest RPM at the idle setting, then drop the idle by using the throttle stop screw, again, at the linkage. Above a certain RPM, the air/fuel mixture transitions over to the main jet and further changes to the mixture screw will not make a change at the higher throttle settings. HTH.

Ron
 
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