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Can Opeler
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I would recommend plugging the retard port and connecting the advance port to manifold vacuum. Then setup your timing again. In a crude way, consider port vacuum an indicator or throttle position and manifold vacuum as an indicator of load. Port vacuum is always supposed to be zero when the throttle is closed. Manifold vacuum will be different depending on is the car at idle or did the engine just come off of full throttle. These two scenarios should have different vacuum readings. I would not want to retard the ignition with manifold advance when you let off the throttle. That would mean spark happens closer to TDC when the engine could be at high RPMs, and you want the exact opposite. I could be wrong here of course.
There’s nothing wrong with vacuum retard working when you close the throttle plates at high rpm. It’s like 4° of difference. Remember when you lightly touch the throttle at 4000rpm you are advancing 22-28° in a split second. Let off the throttle again and you drop that 22-28° again just due to 18-24° vacuum advance + 4° retard
The vacuum retard just makes for a more complete and cleaner burn at idle and off throttle. It can be kept or deleted and you’ll never notice the difference except for a slightly faster idle speed after deleting.

I strongly disagree with moving ported advance to the manifold. I’ve undone this on several cars I’ve helped people tune up. It seems like on every classic car people decide to hook up advance to the manifold. All it does is make the car hard to start and/or virtually guarantee it’s timed incorrectly.

What I see the most is that people end up with is 0° static timing + 18-24° of vacuum advance at idle and a portion of that during cranking which makes the car harder to start. This also makes cars run pretty hot at idle and really makes for an interesting throttle transition from a stop in my experience.

What I see the rest of the time is that static timing gets set to around 10° retarded because the car was timed by ear and the 10° retard compensated for most of the excess vacuum advance. Downside is these people get awful top end performance because they get less than 25° advance at WOT.

The common thread with the half dozen people I’ve helped out that had there advance on the manifold is that the car was much better after switching back to ported.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Just an update while I watch paint dry and wait on a couple parts.
Got a chance to play with it again and couldn't get things to do what I wanted.
I got out the carb and choke spray to test for some vac leaks
To my surprise, as soon as I started spraying around the intake at the head Guess what happened?

Also got the fast idol working again I must of somehow deactivated it through all the things I was doing
But I do want to start it cold again tomorrow and see if it stays activated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Now having a chance to reflect on the new symptoms from can't get timing right to mushy brake pedal and 2 days ago interesting enough engine idol would change if I hit the brakes repeatedly a few times and higher idol after I switched to the electronic ignition and the list goes on.
It would now make sense to me that most if not all of this is due to the vacuum leak/leaks I wasn't aware I had
Funny (to me anyway) That I found the nuts to the carb to heat shield/manifold were a little loose so I tightened them and thought ok that would make sense( possible vacuum leak).
I was right there at the problem the whole time but thought no way is it where it is.
My thinking here is correct?
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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As I have said many times: It's always a vacuum leak. Back when I had a normal GT with a 32/36, that I drove for 225K miles over 18 years, it was always a vacuum leak that would cause trouble. 1/8th of a turn to the 6 manifold bolts and good as new. If you have an old oem brake booster, toss it and get yourself a spiffy new Honda big brake booster.

Those darn vac leaks will have you chasing rabbits everywhere but where they are.
 

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Can Opeler
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As I have said many times: It's always a vacuum leak. Back when I had a normal GT with a 32/36, that I drove for 225K miles over 18 years, it was always a vacuum leak that would cause trouble. 1/8th of a turn to the 6 manifold bolts and good as new. If you have an old oem brake booster, toss it and get yourself a spiffy new Honda big brake booster.

Those darn vac leaks will have you chasing rabbits everywhere but where they are.
Yep on opels it’s always a vacuum leak (or a clogged idle jet for me).

I wonder why Opels are so darn sensitive to vacuum leaks. I’ve had nearly imperceptible vacuum leaks that couldn’t be found with carb cleaner cause havoc numerous times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I was not thinking leaks at all, In fact when I hit that area with the cleaner and idle went way down I was still in disbelief
No that was a coincidence, until the third time and exact same response at the exact same place
I guess that's it's revenge for leaving outside ( covered) for a week while I straightened out the garage.
The irony is when I did bring it in to start on the ignition redo I didn't start it to bring it in I just pushed it in.
Had I started it I'm sure this would have been noticed almost right away.
 
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