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Detritus Maximus
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Hi Lynn, don't worry about the info, I wasn't criticising. Since I 'liked' your post I figured I should what part I was 'liking'! Me being a little silly, as if that would surprise anyone.

At one point the 840s were down below $9k. I could afford to buy, but probably not maintain..or insure! I truly believe they will become a top collectable from that era and the prices will become stratospheric for a good one.
 

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This one isn’t really Italian, but it will look Italian when it is done. Tube frame chassis car with a hand hammered body which replicates a 1962 Ferrari GTO. Park lights, tail lights, fog lights, emblems and gauges are genuine Ferrari parts. The chassis is almost an exact copy of the original GTO, except that it has been modified to accept Corvette C4 front and independent rear suspension. Has a narrowed Corvette rear and Corvette front aluminum a arm front suspension with coilovers. The original GTO had a live axle. The Corvette hubs have been modified to accept real Borrani wire wheels, the same ones that came on the GTO. This car has never been painted, or had a power train installed. Story I got was that the fellow that made the body died in the late 80s right after he finished the car. The body is a work of art. Once I get my shop finished, I plan to spend four years making this my dream car. And this is the reason for my next purchase. GT Roy posted a pic of this car with the Opel GT nose right in front. He took the pic a couple years ago when he stopped by to visit us while driving across Oklahoma. He got to sample a genuine “time warp” here in Guthrie, OK, with most of our Victorian buildings still standing. As a side note, the 250GTO finished 2nd and 3rd at the 24 hours of Lemans. Not bad for a 3.0 liter car with a live axle. First place? An experimental Ferrari with a larger engine (designated a 330, which translates to 4.0 liters of V12) and independent rear suspension. Mine will have independent rear suspension and a 4.0 liter V12…. from the next car.

I have very few pictures of this car.
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Detritus Maximus
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That is a nice project.
 

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Years ago I took the body of my Triumph Spitfire to a shop in Plainfield, NJ, to have floorboards and other parts welded in. At the time, there was in that shop a partially wrecked GTO -- the owner had parked the car up against the guardrail during a vintage race. All the fabricator had to go by to restore it was photographs that had been taken pre-wreck, Took him over a year to complete the job -- I spent a lot of time there watching the progress. It would be improper of me to disclose the car's owner, but Tom Caruso was the metal bender and he has put together a few top-place finishers, including at least one Best-in-Show, at Pebble Beach.
 

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I was told that only one of the original 39 '62 GTOs still has ALL of its original sheet metal. Several have NONE of the original body work. At least one was rebodied into the next generation GTO body which isn't nearly as beautiful.

Amazingly, none were considered particularly valuable by 1970. They were just not practical street cars, and no longer competitive as race cars. They didn't even have inside door handles and no roll up windows. You had to pull a cable on the inside to open the door. One was donated to a vo-tech in Texas for students to practice working on it.

The most expensive one last sold at auction brought over $48 million. Reportedly, the most expensive one to change hands privately brought $80 million.
 

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Found a couple more pics. You can see the 400i on the lift above the GTO, as well as my 1.1 GT in front. I believe this was taken before I built the 1.1 engine and installed it in the GT.
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Which brings us to the next one. 1983 Ferrari 400i. This car was hit in the left front, but is still drivable on a limited basis. It is what we call a “lot driver”. I only purchased it so I could use the engine (a V12) in my GTO body. Have you tried finding a complete running Ferrari V12? Easier to buy a wrecked car. I have already recouped a lot of my investment selling a few parts I know I will never use. Half the Ferrari guys think this is a great idea. The other half think I am the devil for not saving the 400i. Trust me, in the Ferrari world, there are princes and pricks; sometimes both to the extreme.
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Detritus Maximus
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I was told a long time ago, by someone with connections 'in the know' that there were more supposedly real GTOs in just Italy than than were actually made. And we aren't talking Favre's recreations.

As an example, not necessarily a GTO, there was a court case trying to determine the provenance and genuine-ness of three separate cars claiming to be a particular race Ferrari. It seems the car had had the motor replaced with a bigger one. The chassis had been replaced, either due to updating or damage. And it was rebodied after it's racing days. So there was a provable chain of ownership for the complete car. But someone had taken the original body and had a chassis built. Someone else had a new body made for the chassis. I think one of them had the original motor. All of them claiming to be 'THE' car.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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I also remember when no one would think about saving a 400. Even a decent paint job was more than they were worth. I liked them. I also liked the 250 and 330GTEs which were not exactly in demand for awhile either.
 

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There have been quite a few conversions of real Ferrari V12 cars made into GTO recreations. These days, it is easy to figure out an original from a copy. All the original chassis numbers are know. One fellow that owns one of the originals really liked to vintage race. But, once the car got so valuable that he didn't dare put it on a track, he paid someone $1million to recreate the car from scratch. It is so true to the original, it qualifies for most of the vintage racing. My car will get an Oklahoma State issued VIN. No chance of fooling anyone with the twin cam V12 as well as the Corvette suspension. Not that I want to; but I get accused of it anyway.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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That's the goofy part. The GTEs didn't have a whole lot of value in the mid to late 80's. Most people didn't even know they existed. All anybody cared about were 'real' Ferraris, the GTO, Testa Rossa, Testarossa, Daytona (eh, sorry, 365 GTB), the Ferris Beuhler 250 GT CS, and Magnum PI's 308, the stuff they saw on tv. Even the Dinos got disrespect. No one really complained about using the GTEs and 400s for donor cars. I'm sure a lot of usable cars were broken up for spares because they needed a few thousand in repairs or paint. But now the near identical recreations get disparaged.

I think that is why it irritates me when I see viably restorable Opels and 71-73 Mustangs (I have one of those, too) cut up because they can make somebody some money because they can't afford a perfect restoration (more of a Mustang problem than an Opel problem).

Sorry, I'm ranting..that is an ambitiously cool project that you will be able to enjoy driving when the critics have to leave theirs at home. And know that you put it together.
 

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This is one of my favorites. I get thumbs up everywhere I go with this truck. 1949 Studebaker 2R16A truck with a dump bed. This truck is the most rust free pre 1960 truck I have ever seen. Even the cab corners are rust free. Before my ownership it spent its entire life in South Dakota hauling wheat. After a while, it was retired, but fortunately, it was parked inside a barn in the high desert. It still retains the original dump bed, sometimes referred to as a stake bed. In just a few minutes, the sides can be removed, converting it to a flat bed. A local fellow bought it to deliver roofing materials to job sites. I bought this when we still lived on 2.5 acres and were planning to build a shop from scratch. We were going to have to move huge amounts of dirt. An existing pipeline easement precluded us from building where we wanted, so we moved. I loved the truck and it has come in really handy for moving all kinds of things: grown kids and their belongings to a new home, sod, gravel, sand, loads of top soil and even a tree with an 800 pound root ball. I don’t believe it has ever been painted. The paint is worn through to primer on one fender. The flat head 6 cylinder head cracked. Instead of fixing it, I built new cross members and swapped in a bigger engine and 5 speed trans out of a 70s Chevy grain truck. The Chevy trans had provisions for a PTO to run the hydraulics for the dump bed, but I was unable to find a PTO to fit the passenger side. Couldn’t put it on the driver side, as the Studebaker gas tank was in the way. Oh yeah, forgot about that gas tank; I had to modify it when I did the engine trans swap as the Chevy trans was way bigger than the old Studebaker 4 speed crash box (no synchros in any gear). So, I converted the dump bed to electric over hydraulic. Now, I don’t even need the truck running to run the dump bed. Just push a button in the cabin to raise the bed, and the other button to lower. Last three
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pictures shows the Studebaker next to my old F150. About the same length.
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Detritus Maximus
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Lynn-

Looking at the pic of the tubeframe inside the car. The door looks like a regular production piece from something, not a handbuilt item. Am I wrong on that?
 

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Nope. Not sure what it is out of; but I suspect a 240Z. There is no outer skin on either door. I have to make them. Also have to decide how much of that shell I want to use.

The back window is Lexan, just like the originals. The originals used Lexan for the side windows as well. But they did not roll up and down. There were two pieces on top of each door, and they slide to open. So you would have either the front half open or the back half open. Take your pic. I have some window slider frames that I got with the body and frame.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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I see. That would make a little sense since there was the Z car based GTO replica. Maybe the builder used one as a shortcut for doors and? Do you have a windscreen or need to make one? If did use the Z as a starting point, he might have used the roof and windscreen structure.
 

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I was told it would accept a 240Z windscreeen. I guess the only way to find out is to buy one. Of course it it doesn't fit, I am stuck with a windshield. Keep looking for someone parting out a Z with a cracked wiindshield I can get for next to nothing for trial fit.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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It would be cool if it was a Z windshield. That would save a lot of hassle and cost.

Nice Studebaker truck. A friend had a 51 or 52 Chevy/GMC 3100 with a little lift on the back.
 

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It would be cool if it was a Z windshield. That would save a lot of hassle and cost.

Fingers crossed.
 

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One more before I head down into the garage and get a few things done.

1963 Vanden Plas Princess. This was the first British car I ever owned. My older brother has had many MGs and Triumphs. Although built in 63, it looks more like a late 30s car. Those brits were a bit behind the times. It is a very classy looking limo. Vanden Plas was contracted by Rolls and Bentley for coachwork on their limos. In the mid fifties, they got the idea of building their own limos. After all, they had all the tools and equipment to make the bodies. They made a deal with Austin to use an Austin truck chassis. So, this is a very elegant hand made body put on an antiquated Austin truck chassis (think bread truck or milk truck). It looks fantastic, but it drives and handles, well, like a British bread truck. Front fenders are steel. The rest of the body is all hand formed (some English wheel, some just panel beater hammers and shot bags, wooden bucks, etc.) alloy; i.e. aluminum. Interesting to drive a four speed on the column, RH drive car and shift left handed. Took about 5 minutes to master. My wife refused to try. Car was originally black, but was repainted silver and emerald green before I took ownership. I own another British car, but it was given to me. I have not even seen it yet.

The engine is a straight six and very easy to work on. Points and filters can be had at the local NAPA. One of the first maintenance items I tackled was removing the oil pan and cleaning out the sludge. According to the service manual, that is recommended every 20,000 miles. Can you imagine having that as part of the maintenance schedule on a modern car. I also had to put on a water pump. Only three bolts and a couple of brackets to remove…. except it is so close to the radiator that you must remove the radiator first. Of course to remove the radiator, you have to remove the front grill. To remove the front grill, you have to remove the front bumper AND the hood, which is hinged in the middle; so it takes three people to get it off without scratching anything. Kind of like wresting jello. My twin grandsons love to go to Braums for ice cream in the limo.

Funny story. While I had the radiator out, I took it to a local fellow who still operates an old time radiator shop that his dad started in 1955. Boy, talk about a dying art; repair and maintenance of brass radiators. So, drag this radiator into his shop and Donnie says: “What the hell are you bringing me now?” Before I had a chance to respond, he says: “Looks like an old Rolls Royce radiator.” Well, almost. It is the same radiator used in the Rolls limos from the same period. He was unable to get it in good working condition, so we had to have a core special made to fit the tanks. Ouch!!! The water pump? Cost like $35 and was about a 10 minute job.... after getting all the other pieces out of the way.

While taking care of that, I decided I needed to reinforce the brackets for the modern alternator a PO had installed. I made an extra support brackets out of one I had laying around. Problem was that I needed a nut to put on an existing stud coming out of the engine block. You have all used 3/8 by 24 hardware as well as 3/8 by 16. But his one was 3/8 by 20. Only in England, right? So, I had to order one from some guy in England that sells hardware.

This first pic is in front of our house. You can see my 83 Bimmer, and if you look closely, you can see Sherri's first MRoadster. On the other side of that is the CL600 I bought her to replace the roadster. That means this picture was taken just before I sold the roadster to a good friend. Funny how we get attached to cars. Sherri was so excited when we got the CL600, and she really liked how smooth it was on the brick streets of Guthrie. Still, when my friends came to pick up the roadster, I looked over at her and she had tears in her eyes. I told her I wouldn't have sold it if I knew how attached she was. She said: "No, I am fine, and I love my new car. But that was the first special car anyone ever bought just for me." We had shopped all the two seater sports cars we could find before she decided on the MRoadster. I couldn't forget how sad she was, so a couple years later when a deal came along a a twin to her first one, I bought her another. Again, she decided it just wasn't practical enough, so it too is gone. Boy, the prices on those things are really going up now!!!
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Ooo, time to show off all of my family's non-Opels! :D
Our "collection" primarily consists of Mustangs.
It all started with my dad's '66 - his first car:
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And now we have all of these:
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From left to right - 96 Deep Violet Purple Boss Shinoda (MK1?), 96 Bright Tangerine GT, 1 of 134 built, which just crossed 485,000 original miles, my 98 GT, and my dad's 98 Cobra that he bought new.
My brother got tired of Fords and bought a 72 Corvette,
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that now looks like this:
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We also have 2 Jeeps, only one of which we take offroading because we can't justify modding both lol:
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(And it's not just cars... This isn't even half of our airplanes)
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