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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought new panhard bar, and trailing arm bushings from OGTS. The panhard bushings went in fairly easily. The trailing arm bushings are another story. I have boiled them, greased them, and exerted all of the force I can muster. The bushings have a lip on both ends, which makes it impossible to start them into the hole. It seems like I need to trim a lip on each one, so I can get them started. Anybody know the trick?

Wes
 

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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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I bought new panhard bar, and trailing arm bushings from OGTS. The panhard bushings went in fairly easily. The trailing arm bushings are another story. I have boiled them, greased them, and exerted all of the force I can muster. The bushings have a lip on both ends, which makes it impossible to start them into the hole. It seems like I need to trim a lip on each one, so I can get them started. Anybody know the trick?

Wes
He Wes - just curious if there were any directions for OGTS. I have noticed that the material they use in a lot of reproductions/applications of this nature tend to be of a harder material that is much more difficult to get it into the hole. Feel sure there are several people that have had the experience and will give up the secret. Good Luck. Carl
 

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Can Opeler
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Make sure the holes are smooth. I clean them up with 400 grit sand paper. Then put a longer bolt through both halves of the bushing and arm with a large washer at the head and nut side of the bolt. Use a wrench to tighten and encourage both sides to go in. You can also use a vice. They will go in but never by hand.
 
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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No instructions, just said press fit in the description. This is rubber, but very solid rubber. Boiling didn't have much, if any effect on the pliability / workability. I have the interior surfaces shiny and smooth. Those outer lips are so much bigger diameter that the i.d. of the holes. Hard to imagine even getting one started.
 

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No instructions, just said press fit in the description. This is rubber, but very solid rubber. Boiling didn't have much, if any effect on the pliability / workability. I have the interior surfaces shiny and smooth. Those outer lips are so much bigger diameter that the i.d. of the holes. Hard to imagine even getting one started.
Boiling would make it more flexible but also make it expand. You might try putting it in the freezer to shrink it, but it probably wouldn't shrink much.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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The bolt should work, but if you put a wide hose clamp around the lip you might be able to compress it enough to get it started.
On other stuff I've used a piece of cheap, thin flue pipe wrapped around something and the a couple hose clamps to compress things smaller, then use the bolt to pull it thru.
 
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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Great ideas! I will have another go at it.
Hey Krewzer, when you do proceed with this project could you post a review of what you did and how you did it and pictures would help a lot. I read what a lot of people talk about but it is the step by step instructions with pictures that really puts it together and make it easier for the next person looking for an answer, to what many times, seems like an impossible task. Thanks, Carl
 

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I bought new panhard bar, and trailing arm bushings from OGTS. The panhard bushings went in fairly easily. The trailing arm bushings are another story. I have boiled them, greased them, and exerted all of the force I can muster. The bushings have a lip on both ends, which makes it impossible to start them into the hole. It seems like I need to trim a lip on each one, so I can get them started. Anybody know the trick?

Wes
The only thing I can think of that you might try is heating up the metal to make it expand, with a blow dryer but not a propane torch, lol.
 

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couldn't you put a smig of grease on them and or inside of the t.a. then use a vice to push them in? or even a c clap.
I don't recall to much issue when I replaced mine
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As requested, here is my trailing arm bushing installation; Parts / tools used were:

1 - 3/8" x 16 x 6" full threaded bolt
2- 3/8" x 16 nuts
2- heavy 3/8" flat washers
1- wide hose clamp
1 - convex heavy washer from my vast collection of washers
1 - crank snout socket from an SBC 350 ( I also had a 30mm socket, but the multi-point was a little hard on the bushing)
PXL_20210418_174604610.jpg

Sample pic of a big and little bushing
PXL_20210418_192431515.jpg

From the tools list.
PXL_20210418_192439515.jpg

Sorry, no pic of the hose clamp usage, but it was needed to get the larger bushings started, by clamping the lead bushing lip, and making the diameter close to the I.D. of the trailing arm hole. The convex washer kept the bolt centered in the hole.
PXL_20210418_192521029.jpg

At some point, using my method, the bushing spacer bottomed out at the washer on the other side.
PXL_20210418_192717386.jpg

This is when the SBC crank socket was needed to create more space, for drawing the bushing to its final position.
PXL_20210418_195818699.jpg

In less than an hour, I was able to install all four bushings, without molesting the paint on the arms too badly. Thanks to all who offered installation tips! Without a press, this is a tried and true method.

Wes
 

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Fantastic glad you got it done. The pics and step by step was plus.
seeing them made me realize I went with a different bushing set. That maybe why i didn't have the same issue
 
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