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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter #23
So I checked timing with the car off. Rotated the distributor rotor to line up with the mark at 5:00 on the distributor housing. That puts the first piston at exactly TDC and it is. The BB on the fly wheel is about 3/4 inch below the pointer. What does that mean.

Should there be any play in the rotor, that is should it move back and forth by hand. My moves back and forth by about 1/4 inch.
I'm no engine guru, but I did sleep in a Best Western Hotel. I'm pretty sure that if you are at TDC the pointer on the bell housing should be pointing at the round mark on the flywheel and the line on the cam shaft ledge behind the timing cover should be aligned with the round mark on the cam sprocket. You have to have those things lined up or your dizzy position is meaningless.

Your dizzy has a mechanical advance that is underneath of what you can see with the cap off and can't be seen. This toggles back and forth when you rotate the rotor and the rotor should spring back to it's starting position. If you have deleted the vacuum advance AND removed the vacuum canister, then I'm pretty sure you HAVE TO rivet or weld the top plate, that you CAN see when you remove the diz cap, to the base plate underneath it. If you leave the vac canister attached and connected to the diz top plate, then you're sort of okay, but you might have slightly wandering timing.

If you are at TDC and the timing marks at the cam sprocket and the bell housing are all lined up, but you inserted your dizzy shaft and didn't spin it a little to take into account the angled gear teeth on the crankshaft causing the diz shaft to rotate as you remove and inserted it, then your dizzy housing will not line up with the rotor in the acceptable location. That's okay, you can still find the spark window, but you may have to rotate the dizzy housing beyond the normal location to get yourself in the right spark timing range.

You will need to remove your valve cover to verify that cam timing is at the right spot.

Gee, it sounds like I know what I'm talking about. Don't be fooled by it, I'm just a dumbass. Listen to the other guys first.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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14,402 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
I think charlie pulled a fast one so he could win this year. Everybody has GTX fatigue...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5rRZdiu1UE
You wouldn't believe how many people I had to pay to vote for him. Some guys wouldn't take anything less than 100 bucks. At least now we don't have to listen to him whine that he never wins a trophy or gets recognition for all the great work he has done for us.


:lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :lmao:
 

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Bikini Inspector
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5,771 Posts
So I checked timing with the car off. Rotated the distributor rotor to line up with the mark at 5:00 on the distributor housing. That puts the first piston at exactly TDC and it is. The BB on the fly wheel is about 3/4 inch below the pointer. What does that mean.
this means your timing is set to around 5-15* btdc. when rotor hits #1 and delivers spark, it is noit quite at TDC. your timing looks good. somewhere here on forum someone measured exactly how teeth translates to degrees on flywheel. sounds like about 10BTDC to me.

and yes there should be play in rotor, it should spring back.
 

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The play in the rotor does not spring back, you can move it back and forth and it stays where you left it, again about 1/4 inch. I have electronic ignition, pentex. I have reset the carb two turns out and worked on the timing - just took it out for a spin with the vacuum advance capped off. Ran well only dieseled a fraction and started right back up. Last time I took it out before the new jet and working on the carb settings and timing I had to use starter spray to get it running when I stopped to get gas. So today was a marked improvement. I have used a vacuum pump gauge to check the vacuum advance unit and it will not hold pressure. I cannot find anything on repair or replacement of this part - anywhere. Thanks for your feed back.
 

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Bikini Inspector
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5,771 Posts
one of us will have a spare vacuum advance. you replace the entire unit. easy. many of us dont use it.

lubricate your distributor to where it will rebound back. it sounds dried or gummed up.

I was just thinking too, you mentioned #1 piston looks to be at TDC with dot behind... without a dial stop indicator or piston stop it is hard to be sure youre at TDC. I can eyeball it throughspark plug hole pretty darn good.

Many Opel Gurus say the dot is off on some flywheels. Mine have all been spot on. I wouldnt worry about that until you get your dizzy going smoothly and advance replaced.

under rotor button there is a hole with felt sponge inside. Squirt lubricarting oil in there and visually inspect plates and springs. get it moving freely with rebound.
 

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So It appears that I have a small vacuum leak at the gasket between the carb and the manifold, specifically on the back nearest the fire wall . Since I am going to be taking this apart do you recommend the thicker gasket and a heat shield - anything thing else, while the carb is off you can recommend would be appreciated.
The most important part is to use the thick gasket (phenolic spacer) that’s actually what the Ford Mercury gasket OGTS sells is is a phenolic spacer coated with gasket material. Since there’s a variety of different ways I’m just going to share my success, there are many other ways to do it with gasket sealer etc.. One thing that happens to the base of the Weber 32/36 is people (myself included when I was younger) unknowingly over torque the mounting nuts and that causes the base to not be flush or flat. First thing I did was to have a piece of thick glass cut about 10” x 3” x ⅜” then get a pack of 3M 03008 3-2/3" x 9" Emery Cloth with Assorted Grit Sizes https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FP8HUU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_hCy4CbRP1MX14
I’ve resurfaced the bottom of my carburetors in the past by just setting the carburetor on the edge of the work bench without having to disassemble anything from the carburetor. If you can lay your carburetor on top of flat surface and not be able to slide a piece of paper between it and the base of the carburetor then you can skip this step.
I then baught this,
eBay
it comes with a gasket on both sides. If you can find one without the thin paper buy it. I found the best way to use this was to remove the factory paper gaskets (they’re too thin for my liking) by soaking the phenolic spacer in gasoline or some solvent like laquer thinner. After I removed them I glued one of these on each side 99005.068 - Carburetors Unlimited using Permatex 80008 Form-a-gasket No 1 Sealant Fast Drying Hard Setting 3 Oz Tube https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01J0618CS/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_5Oy4CbFY93XDQ on each side let sit overnight sandwich them between heavy books.
Then assemble (from the manifold up) using 1 Weber gasket, heat shield, newly rebuilt phenolic spacer then the carburetor. Gasket sealer is optional but probably not needed after doing all this I don’t use the sealer and I have a perfect seal at the base. The other variable is of course the carburetor mounting surface on the intake manifold,
it’s probably going to be fine. I had mine resurfaced because I’m very meticulous, you can skip this next step but if you still have a vacuum leak at the base you’ll have to come back to it. I’ve resurfaced the mounting surface by stuffing a rag on the opening, make sure everything is dry inside of the intake first then removing the studs and using the emory sheets taped to the glass there’s enough room to work. Carefully remove the rag then use a shop vacuum to clean any fine metal particles out from the intake plenum. To avoid this last process remove the studs. take your glass or any other reliable flat object and inspect for flatness especially around the stud openings, again due to over torquing the aluminum can be raised around the studs. Now after inspecting the bottom of the carburetor and inside the intake to be sure there’s no metal dust if you did any resurfacing, assembling goes as follows from the intake manifold up: Weber gasket, heat shield (be sure it’s flat, not bent), phenolic spacer then carburetor. Using stainless steel studs, nuts and wave washers is also recommended. If you’re going with your existing studs then use thin washers and at least use lock washers. If you can verify all surfaces are flat and are sure you can get things done without the need to do a lot of things that I’ve done. I’d say that the least likely resurfacing would be on the intake plenum the factory skim is kinda rough you don’t need perfection just look at the areas for flatness. If you do all this I guarantee you will have no leaks at the base.
If you decide to use the sealer between gaskets and underneath the carburetor go very thin, it’s okay but keep it away from the throttle openings use just around the perimeter and mounting holes here’s a good non hardening sealer for assembly: Permatex 80015 Form-A-Gasket #2 Sealant, 1.5 oz. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002UEOU0/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_-by4CbNQXGJPH
It’s a thicker version of Permatex
High tack just not as stringy and easier to manage.
 

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Have been painting the interior of the living room, foyer and the breakfast nook off the kitchen for 7 days, complete with scaffolding and I took a break to help my mother's boyfriend move into the same retirement community that my mother now lives in, about 31/2 hours from Mount P. She is 92 and he is 78, so I have been out of pocket for the past 9 or 10 days. Anyway I am revisiting and studying some of the issues, discussed above, and areas that I need to gain a better understanding of in hopes of making my car both look and run like new, better than new is actually my goal. I know that I need to fine tune my Weber. I will most definitely replace the studs with stainless steel as it is a difficult production to try and get the nuts off and will also replace the nuts and washers with stainless steel. Will check to make sure both surfaces are truly flat and install another new thick gasket/spacer using Permatex 80015 Form-A-Gasket #2 Sealant, 1.5 oz as recommended. I had some major dieseling problems but that has mostly gone away as I started using premium gas and added grommets to those big empty spaces/holes on the firewall, to the linkage which made a remarkable difference in response and performance, can't believe I missed that.... Also with the new Radiator my engine temp in on the very low end which I believe also helped with the dieseling. My question, since I will be removing the Carb, do I really need the heat shield, never had one, and I have read that it is difficult to install correctly/flat and I do want to keep things as simple as possible. Of course I have the Weber gas boiling issue but with that said my experience of late has been minor dieseling and no problem restarting the car on hot days. Just hold the pedal to the floor and varoom its up and running - did not use to be that way - used a lot of starter fluid but not now.
Additionally I replaced the distributor with a used one from OGTS as the springs in the original were disconnected and bent and doing nothing, however since I have a 2.0 and based on what I have read, I have capped off the vacuum ports at the distributor and at the carburetor. The car is running very well but I have reached the point that I am going for perfection. I have eliminated vacuum leaks as a concern, believe the timing is where it needs to be, and want to be certain that the Carb is the best it can be as my next step will be to adjust the valves. The engine is a 2.0, 2500 miles, and if memory serves, and at this point in the game it does not always serve, the timing is at 14 degrees advanced, if I recall, which was recommended earlier this year, and seems to be working well. Again the car is running very, very well my goal is to make sure the settings are all spot on. Electronic ignition so no point or condenser to worry with. I want to start concentrating on MPG, that is not a huge concern however just want to be efficient. When I get it all back together, during cooler fall weather, then I will do the final adjustment to the carb.


428521

A slight over site on my part......just happened to be scanning the forum and someone mentioned grommets/bushings for the carb linkage - WOW,....
20200412_134205.jpg
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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1,712 Posts
The heat shield is just another aid for the heat issues. It is up to you to figure if you need to try it or not.

BTW, I never use stainless on engine fasteners. SS is too much prone to gall; just lookin' for trouble IMHO. (But my stuff is not for pretty....)
 
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